Jump to content

Blogs

 

Trevor Bolder

Sad to report the death ( 21st May,2013 ) of Bowie's bass man from the 'Spiders from Mars',Trevor Bolder.Trevor had been suffering with Pancreatic cancer for some time.His younger brother,Andy Bolder also died only a couple of months ago with a throat problem.I got to know Trevor when he played & produced some tracks with his brothers & friends at Fairview studio in Willerby,East Yorkshire,U.K.( the same studio that demo'd Heatwave's first album,Boogie Nights etc ),in the 1970's.His later playing career was with U.K. band 'Uriah Heep'. A very sad loss.

peteraltongreen

peteraltongreen

 

City Hall gig 090413

Did a gig this week at our local City Hall ( Kingston upon Hull,East Yorkshire England ) I decided to take my Heritage 140 (1986) as it looks great,plays great,and sounds mega ! It handled the mostly rythmn guitar gig excellently,adding a snap to the very limited soloing that was required for the gig. I had to laugh.The 10 piece band,(piano,bass,guitar drums + 2 trumpets,2 saxes & 1 trombone + singer ) were only required to play 6 tunes.We'd had a band rehearsal,as we needed to shorten the scores to fit in with some dancers that were performing their routines to our music.Of course,there were no guitar charts,so I photographed the piano score,then wrote myself the relevant charts...Great ! Turn up for the gig..all change.Different tunes,still no music,so I had to busk the lot.Fortunately,it was all simple stuff I'd played before.How the host managed to stretch 20 minutes,or less music into a 2 hour show was a work of genius.We live & learn. I played the Heritage through a Fender London solid state amp.I knew it was a long carry from the elevator to the stage,so my little folding buggy did the honours.

peteraltongreen

peteraltongreen

 

Charlie Gracie 2012.

I have long been a fan of rocker Charlie Gracie.I recall going to my local record store around 1958 time,and buying his then current E.P. ( Extended Play, 7" vinyl disc,usually with 4 tracks for those newer members to the planet !) Not only did I constantly play the 4 tracks of the E.P.,but I oggled the Guild guitar on the cover,with It's 3 P-90 style Pick ups,and a row of tone switches to die for ! Charlie had many hits both here (U.K.) & in the U.S.A, and he was right up there with Elvis,Buddy,Eddie & Gene.Fast forward to 2012 ( Time DOES fly ! ).I never,ever in my wildest dreams thought I would not only share the stage with my old idol,but be backing him too ! Not only that,but he still uses that Guild guitar,and, I GOT TO PLAY IT ! This is a guitar that has been played by most of the great, early rockers,so it's hallowed ground indeed. I have seen & chatted to Charlie before,but this topped the lot.Charlie gave us all his hits,and some great songs from others too.I hope I get that job again ! Now,the technical :Charlie played his Guild through a 1968 Fender Twin Reverb,that I'd borrowed from a pal for him.The bass player used a Gibson EB0 from around 1970 time,through a Mark 2 x 10" bass combo.I was sorely tempted to take my Heritage 575. Two things stopped me.1) Charlie was playing an archtop,and I didn't want to clash so,2) I played my Fender U.S Strat plus De Luxe ( 1988 ) with it's 3 Lace sensors,through a Fender Conert top from 1985 ( A Rivera design ) & a 1 x 12 " cabinet.When I'm unsure of things,I take a Strat ! All sounded great to me. Thanks,Charlie.

peteraltongreen

peteraltongreen

 

P-92 + G&L Bluesboy = So tasty it doesn't need sauce

I took out the stock humbucky out of my trusty G&L last night, and replaced it with a Fralin P-92. Gosh dern, after some adjustments, I can't believe it. It sounded pretty good before, now it's incredible. It's really become 3 different instruments depending on the switch placement. Really nice!   It even seems to make my tone controls more effective, although I wonder if I shouldn't upgrade those down the road. I need to do something about the jack, as it's constantly loose, and doesn't hold the cable plug very well either. $4 + solder fix...but that would mean I have to stop playing!

ridethatbike

ridethatbike

 

Starting out

I've been here awhile now on the HOC, so I figured I might start keeping track of my musical journey here.   It's funny to me that a majority of the forums out there are built on the acquiring/selling of gear, rather than the playing of it. At least the ones I frequent. I figure it's about time that I have some cool "stuff" and ought to focus on playing rather than chasing some tone/idea I have in my head.   I've been learning with Learn & Master for about a year, and am maybe half way through the material. I also bought one of Marty Schwartz's Blues DVD sets. Both courses are great. Sometimes I wonder if my efforts aren't too varied at times though. I guess as long as I'm playing, it doesn't matter too much.   My musical influences are across the board, but if you cut it down who my favorite 5 guitars players are, I think the list would go something like this:   1) Warren Haynes 2) Buddy Guy 3) Kenny Wayne Shepherd 4) Derek Trucks 5) Albert Collins   Now those 5 guys are way across the board as far as playing styles, but I think they are all masters at what they do. If I were to extend the list into general musicianship and how much I enjoy them, I'd have to include a few more:   Trace Bundy Dave Matthews Eddie Vedder   So you can kinda see where I'm coming from. I still love the "grunge" scene from the 90's, and a lot of the late 60's-70's rock.   Sometimes when you study a language, you can learn a lot about a group of people and how they think. Music is very reflective of the setting it was developed in as well. Kinda cool.   Alright, that's enough rambling for now. Talk to you all again soon.

ridethatbike

ridethatbike

 

A fun time was had by us

This time we were lucky enough to have Aaron playing with us - he drove up, basically from Huntington WV. He arrived just in time to help us set up on the KIA stage. We had hoped to play a couple songs at the soundcheck to dial in the sound and get reacquainted, but no dice. The powers that be rushed down the stairs when we started to play and said we had to stop playing because they were able to hear us while they were talking on the phone. Oh well, so much for that - we just decided that we'd just have a quick beer to calm the nerves and hit the stage when it was time to start. We were pretty loose and casual for sure, but at least we enjoyed actually getting together and playing for the first time, really in about ten years. Our arrangements changed on the fly and we tried not to get in each other's way... and the room is difficult acoustically.   Here's a video of Devil Ray one of Dan's originals from quite a while back. I just played harp, giving Aaron free rein to improvise on guitar.  

Doug

Doug

 

Skyping at practice

We got together on Friday and Saturday nights to practice for our upcoming gig. Aaron, our long lost lead guitarist extraordinaire lives in West Virginia. so he wanted to hear what we now sound like. He came up with the idea of getting on Skype and communicating with us while we go through the set list. Seemed like an odd idea, but we gave it a try. I repositioned my iMac to a spot that could get the whole band in frame and we dialed him up. We announced which song we were going to play, then charged into it with Aaron watching through the magic screen. After we finished we'd talk about where his solo or part might fit into the arrangement we had been working up. We have been trying to add room for his guitar and vocals all along, but this was a great way to make sure we are all on the same page.   Every now and then when we were in the middle of a song we'd check the monitor to see if Aaron was smiling or caught a slight change in the arrangement to what he might have been used to... what? no Aaron? Then we'd see a little bit of his headstock bouncing around and his head peeking into frame with a big smile. That was so strange to see, and great to experience.   What a great time that was. I'm hoping our gig goes well, and i'm much more confident that it will thanks to technology I would have never considered. We talked about how great it would be to have him in our headphones playing along with our live mix, but latency issues would certainly prevent that (for now).

Doug

Doug

 

Friday night practice

Pretty hard to find the energy after a long week of work and everything else. Dan just returned from Milwaukee after visiting his daughter and grandkid when I called to remind him. Joe lives in Chicago and snuck out of work a couple minutes early so he could hit the road and sit in traffic. Then drive all the way to Kalamazoo after a long day/week on his new job. John has been working all week and keeping things up at home where they have a horse farm and 40 acres to maintain.   You get the point, we were all pretty spent. Somehow, though we always manage to summon up enough energy to run through a couple of sets of songs. We made a commitment to this upcoming gig and we have to make sure we are ready. A couple songs in and we are smiling and not lacking for energy anymore. At some point we all realize that we're running out of steam and call it a day. Its only after we finish that we realize just how exhausted we really are. Adrenalin works like that.

Doug

Doug

 

Practice, practice, practice.

Practice? You are talking about practice?   No way around it. You need to do it, both individually and as a group in order to improve. Our band gets together about once a week and tries to tweak our arrangements, learn new covers, write or define compositions we are working on and generally just play together. There's really no substitute for gathering and working on our craft. What is often more difficult for me is working on my playing individually. I have a busy life - or at least I use that excuse - when Its hard to find the time to play alone. My personal practicing often strays from the disciplined structure that would likely help me most. I tend to just noodle around and head back to the same familiar territory.   Maybe it is because I have a regular job and play music mainly for the enjoyment and sheer joy that I experience when gathered with my bandmates, making music together. When its right we all know it and we all experience that "Deep Rich Happy" together... Ooh, this is starting to sound weird. It takes a lot of time and energy to dial in our sound and levels and get it just right. Working out arrangements and fitting the different parts together so they all work and allow for individual space is tricky. I have found that I just don't really have a knack for it - let alone the patience. I just want to plug in and play, not having to worry about the technical details that are vital to creating quality sound and tone.   The playing is what I enjoy and when our former lead guitarist and musical mentor travels the long trip up from West Virginia to join us we'll practice once then hit the stage for a gig. We haven't played together in probably seven or eight years, but he has the chops to be able to jump right back into it and not miss a beat. He's more of an instinctive, improvisational player than we are used to playing with and he'll take us places we don't normally go. More of a jazz player, he tends to really listen and play off what each of us are doing rather than adhere to a predetermined structure. We'll have to be ready to go there with him and that will take practice, both personally and as a "team".   Can't wait.

Doug

Doug

 

Introduction

Hello everyone, I am new here and hope to become a friend. As you may have guessed from my name, I was friends with Billy Grammer and collect his fine flat top guitars. After Billy ended his long time affiliation with Gibson, he chose Heritage as his guitar, whenever he played electric guitar. Billy was a true "Guitarist"! He only played the BEST! He endorsed Heritage. He preferred the H555, and owned several. This has sparked my interest in Heritage. I don't own one yet .. but hope to soon! I have the opportunity to buy one he owned. It was made at the custom shop just for him. All I need is to save up the money. While I an saving .. I would value any guidance, advise, and general knowledge that any of you might be willing to offer. Thank you for your time, Grammerman

grammerman

grammerman

 

Heritage Guitar Info

I received my Heritage H40 acoustic guitar in the year 1976. I have been trying to find out more information about this type of guitar. I came upon this web site and I was hoping for some help. The only information that I came upon is as follows: *****The Heritage guitars was marketed by Unicord (the parent company of Univox) as a budget line of guitars. They were probably made in Korea and there were 4 models. Two were nylon string: the H20 Standard size had a spurce top, mahogany body, slotted head and no fret markers(13.5", $49.50) and the H25 Grand Concert Size (14.5", $66) which was nearly the same thing except size and price. The other two were steel strings: the H30 Grand Concert Size (14.5", $51) with spruce top, mahogany body, flad head, fret dots, Martin style pickguard and pin bridge with screw adjustable saddle, and the H40 Dreadnaught (15.5", 64$), nearly the same. ****   Is this correct or does anyone know more about this kind of Heritage acoustic guitar. Thank you for your help!!!!!!!

1958lmg

1958lmg

 

Heritage Guitar Info

I received my Heritage H40 acoustic guitar in the year 1976. I have been trying to find out more information about this type of guitar. I came upon this web site and I was hoping for some help. The only information that I came upon this information as follows: *****The Heritage guitars was marketed by Unicord (the parent company of Univox) as a budget line of guitars. They were probably made in Korea and there were 4 models. Two were nylon string: the H20 Standard size had a spurce top, mahogany body, slotted head and no fret markers(13.5", $49.50) and the H25 Grand Concert Size (14.5", $66) which was nearly the same thing except size and price. The other two were steel strings: the H30 Grand Concert Size (14.5", $51) with spruce top, mahogany body, flad head, fret dots, Martin style pickguard and pin bridge with screw adjustable saddle, and the H40 Dreadnaught (15.5", 64$), nearly the same. ****   Is this correct or does anyone know more about this kind of Heritage acoustic guitar. Thank you for your help!!!!!!!

1958lmg

1958lmg

 

May 2012 Blog

Recently, more than a dozen of you have reached out to me to know why avatar and signature are blank and why I’m not active on the forum. Yes, I have removed all my personal details from the Heritage Owners website and traded my last Heritage. I feel my passion for Heritage guitars and Owners Club has been quashed. In the words of BB King, “The Thrill is Gone, has gone away.” However, the exact details of why I have departed, or at least taken an indefinite hiatus, from the HOC cannot be posted here at the risk of removal. All I am permitted to say is disagreement has turned into disheartenment.   I’ve enjoyed my time on the HOC and the fellowship bond with so many of you. The personal stories of your daily lives, your experiences, and your dreams are feelings I won’t soon forget. There has been so many moments laughter, encouragement, and quality Heritage (and Non-Heritage) related experiences too countless to mention. I’ve been blessed to share your personal highs such as new guitars, amps, marriages/engagements, and even new dog days. I’ve also shared your pain with the lows like dying/ill friends and family, job losses, or other personal tragedies. All of these life stories are the ties that bind all of us together when we share such personal details. To top it all, the annual celebration to which forum members and guests come together at the invitation to tour the factory and enjoy some quality music entertainment, in which everyone can participate in. All of this makes the Heritage Owners Club a forum unlike any other forum in existence today to which I am thankful to have been part of for the past two years.   I do hope that in the near future my concerns will be addressed. It was my dream, after last year’s PSV IV, to order a custom Heritage for my son when he is older. I want him to experience the joy and excitement I had for Heritage and the HOC. I was only eight years old when Heritage officially became a company. My son is eight years old now. I want him to be part of the next generation of Heritage owners with all the traditions that come with it.   Warmest Regards,   Josh , AKA- DetroitBlues

DetroitBlues

DetroitBlues

 

Itchy fingers

If you had asked me this time last year if the band would be playing again with the same line up I would definitely have said no because I was convinced it couldn't happen. Allen, the drummer, had decided that he was going to look for something else, and I couldn't blame him, he did it honourably and just said he felt things weren't going anywhere without a singer, and we agreed. So, we all shook hands and decided to give it a break. On top of that, Pete with the yellow telecaster went to his house in the south of France for the summer, so I suppose it gave us all some time to sit back and think. I had been convinced that the only way forward was with a singer in the band, and we just could not find one. In fact, recently I went for an audition with some local guys who were looking for a replacement guitar player because they needed some one with a bit more "fire" in their playing. I think I would definitely have been asked to join them, but When I spoke with them a few days after I told them that I didn't think it would work for me.   These were good guys and I liked them, but I have a very deep friendship with Pete and Shaun, and that friendship means a great deal to each of us, I enjoy the company of these guys and Shaun and I have been like brothers since we were fourteen, and we are both 52 now. So, I politely said no thanks and decided to give it some more time to see what happened with the band, which is called Route 62, a spoof on route 66, as the M62 motorway runs just north of the town centre where we are from, and we have previously played gigs in towns along the motorway.   Eventually, about three weeks back Shaun was asking me when we were going to do something, and Pete was also pushing for something to happen. We wondered about Allen, at 66, he is a very competent rock drummer and can lay down a strong beat, his timing and finishing are superb, so we wanted him with us. It turns out though, at the minute there isn't much call for really good experienced rock drummers, so Allen was more than happy to meet up with us. On Thursday of last week I packed my Tokai Les Paul (not risking the 555) and headed of to our practice venue. After nine months of not playing together I was surprised just how tight we were and also I was surprised at just how much I enjoyed it. We just relaxed and played some of the songs we did well, which included Thin Lizzy's version of Whiskey in the Jar, Black Magic Woman, Down at the Doctor's, The Promised land and one or two others that we enjoy. We all had a really good time and we are going to get together each week and put a new set list together, keeping the songs we played well and replacing others with songs we can play effectively. This might mean backing off some songs which I can play great guitar parts in, but fall down because to play them properly we can't do both vocals and guitar.   So, we are going to get a new set list together and see where that takes us. But for a first get back together, it couldn't have gone better.

mark555

mark555

 

good morning from the shaky side

It's morning in CA. I just looked at the HOC member map and there's a good group here in CA. I've been here for 20 years as a resident. Have also resided in Japan, Florida, Massachusetts, New Orleans LA, New York, and my hometown is Charm City, Ballmer MD. As a 6 yr old kid I was the early riser in my house. I'd switch on WMAR at 6:55 am so I could gaze at the test pattern, followed by jets, ol glory and the anthem, and then "The Early Riser" himself, Mr. Stu Kerr. He presented as the station janitor and welcomed early arriving viewers to his show. I remember cartoons and give aways. You could send him a postcard and he would call you up and ask you a question. If you got it right you win a prize. If you got it wrong you win a prize. I scored a camera and a bat as I recall. The camera was a 126mm (?) plastic box w/ a plastic lens. Now I take pictures for a living with a magnesium alloy computer with very nice lenses thank you very much. I no longer have the bat, sadly, but I still swing my bat from the last softball league i played in (highest caliber coed league in Pleasanton, CA) My kind of league, slow pitch- where do ya want it pitching. I led off with a .750 average for the year, all singles. Most teams put their weakest fielders in right. So I let the ball get deep and punch it over the second base-person's head and stroll to first. My bat? Wonder Boy of course.   What is the Portal page? I just looked at it today and don't have it figured yet.

nicknickhall

nicknickhall

 

america can no longer distinguish between solid wood and laminate

So, there's a scofield jsm100 up on ebay. seller says it has a solid wood top. i write to seller, ahem, you describe your guitar as a 335 type (laminate top) and your listing (jsm 100) as a solid maple top and bottom, but ahem, your guitar has a laminate top. seller responds saying his boss at the store where he teaches guitar says it's solid so it's solid. Here's the problem, young americans don't know the diff from a solid piece of carved wood and plywood. I am depressed. has it come to this??? come on kid, really?, you don't know... and, i'm not a solid wood fanatic, i like laminate. laminate is amazing. works great in semi hollows, but geez kid,   this on the same day as a beautiful h530 w/ Bigsby comes up on ebay and the seller intends to ship it in bubble wrap and a gig bag. like that is sufficient protection. common sense says a hard case inside a box might do it but bubble wrap and peanuts to protect a hollow body guitar with a Bigsby on it???   i need a drink.

nicknickhall

nicknickhall

 

November's Blog

Another month as passed and winter is starting to set in. During these cold winter months, I get a little stir crazy. This is the time of year in which I miss playing in a band. Not that I'm a touring professional on the local bar scene, but rather being able to step away from the computer and actually stand up next to bass player and drummer. It's a wonderful experience to say the least. It's an opportunity that only a few HOC members actually get to enjoy on a regular basis. It's a little disheartening to read about other member's complaining band-mates, not having the right gigs, negative feedback from audiences, and so forth. What they may not realize is just how lucky they are to be able get a whole band together, even if its just for a jam. I've tried to put together a regional HOC jam at a couple VFW halls, but they all want money, even though the purpose is to entertain ourselves and some of our nations veterans. I've tried to put together a band, but finding people willing to travel, like the same music, and having a practice space is near impossible. Everyone wants to be paid, no one wants to travel, everyone expects someone else to find a place to practice. What ever happened to enjoying the thrill of making music? What does money have to push us so much?   Tonight will be my first opportunity since last January to play with a band. Granted it will only be a three piece with myself and the bass player sharing vocal duties, but it still going to be a lot of fun. The anticipation for tonight is nearly killing me today as I sit down and write this blog. Both the drummer and the bass player are in the band I parted ways with. But as I have learned, there were no hard feelings when I left as they felt two guitarists were one too many as it was. It worked out for them that I left, for a short while anyway, until their lead guitarist quit because of volume issues they had with him. But I guess that's how it goes. We've seen so many of our guitar hero's come and go from bands and never truly understanding why bands broke up or a member went into a different direction. All we know is the music they produced together and that's how we chose to remember them. The small little behind the scenes parts we never see as an audience or as a fan make a huge difference. Members come and go. There always seems to be someone else ready to fill the shoes of the departing member. Never hurts to be ready on a moments notice if you're looking. Keeping up with contacts and making new contacts helps open doors for you if you don't like taking chances on Criagslist for bands seeking the next Guitar hero.   The first time I played with a real band was in fall of 2010. I loved the blues, I could do a bunch of bluesy licks, play some great I, IV, V rhythms. I thought I had it all down and ready to gig. Showed up for the first rehearsal, and wham! Smacked in the face right off the bat with songs, chords, and progressions I never did before. My guitar was tuned down 1/2 step because I was an avid Stevie Ray Vaughn fan and thought all blues guitarists were tuned down 1/2 step. I struggled to keep up, kept making simple mistakes playing rhythm and didn't have a good time. I was very unprepared. When the band told me "NO" the first time, I went and tried out with another band. But once again, not knowing any real songs killed me. They expected some blues guitar veteran to step in and show them how it's done. I felt like a fool when they asked what I knew or what I could sing, I had nothing. No song lists, no lyrics, nothing. I was stuck again and again had an awful time. I spent a couple weeks listening to the recordings of the first band, going over the rhythms, printing out the lyric sheets, and getting myself prepared. I was determined not to fail this time. I talked my way into a 2nd tryout with the first band. I was told "No" again, but this time I hung in there. No tuning issues, no lost parts, no flubby mistakes. I was having fun playing with a real blues band. I was asked to come back for a third time, but this time as a member of the band. I remained with them for three months, even got to take lead a few times. But doing my homework, being diligent, and pushing the door back open paid off for me. Taking chances and being prepared helped me so much.   As I said, tonight, I'm going back into a band, even if its just for a jam. I've become friends with these guys, there's no expectations, nothing to lose, and everything to gain. If things go well, who knows, maybe we very well could become a whole new three piece band playing a strong blues-rock genre. That's a lofty goal for sure, but at the least I will have some fun. I've been practicing a whole bunch of songs, know several of the song lyrics by heart, I'm ready to go. Will anything really come out of this? I don't know. Will I be prepared? Absolutely. Will this be a step in a right direction musically? Without a doubt. Keeping these contacts and knowing they're gigging regularly, it leaves the opportunity for the future. Who knows, they may know a band seeking another guitarist. It's a real blessing for me to be able to join these guys for a couple hours. I've very thankful I can do this. I hope that the rest of you that are lucky enough to be in a band realize just how wonderful it really is. For those wanting to do a band, know your stuff going in. Know what they're playing and bring the lyrics sheets. Those are valuable tools I need to have so I know when to make chord changes, breaks, and what key to play them in.   Until next month!   DetroitBlues

DetroitBlues

DetroitBlues

 

Our musical path starts somewhere...

Music has always been a strong presence in my life. It has always been around. There are lots of musicians on both sides of my family: my paternal grandfather played acoustic guitar; my mom's youngest brother plays guitar, there are professional musicians on both sides of the family, my parents are very decent singers, so is my sister, I consider myself very musical, my wife is a classically trained pianist (and she plays a lot, too), our children are very musical as well. I grew up with a ton of music: Beatles, Stones, Motown, Samba, Rock'n Roll, Jazz, Reggae, Flamenco, Zydeco, Fado, Gospel, Tango, Blues, Bossa Nova... My paternal grandpa played fun songs on his acoustic, Italian songs mostly, and I enjoyed his music, but it was my uncle, my mom's youngest brother, who really made me want to know more: he had an electric guitar, I can't remember which make and model, probably not a good one by today's standards, by I was fascinated by the buttons and controls and how loud that thing got! My uncle had a cover band, mostly Beatles and Stones, some other 60's stuff, really, really cool stuff. I watched a couple of Beatles movies and bought my first album (Help) at 8 years of age. At 10, I decided the Beatles were always going to be cool, but the Stones won my preference as my number one band. Along with Mick Taylor, Keith Richards, Ron Wood and Brian Jones, my two other main influences are Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix. I am not talking about who I have ultimately come to admire and learn from. I am talking about those who inspired me to pick up a guitar. By the way, guitar was my second attempt at music. I first started at 12, playing the piano, but I could not find one single blues/boogie woogie piano teacher anywhere, and my "classical-music-only-do-not-insist" teacher was strict and I left after a year, without having learned what I wanted. But I managed to learn something, and I did have fun. I found out I could figure out melodies, right hand in piano talk, and I also decided that I liked piano a lot, but it wasn't really the instrument I wanted to learn. That's when I started to listen to a lot of guitar music again, after a progressive rock period. All of a sudden my life was full of high gain music: Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones, AC/DC, JHE, Zappa, Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden, Van Halen...so I got myself a guitar. It was a Giannini (Jazzmaster replica) that was actually pretty decent; not great, but a good beginner level electric; got a teacher that was very cool, my friend to this day, and took lessons for three months, then I moved, sold my guitar and bought a guitar that was too much of a hype and almost ruined my musical life. It was the mid-eighties and EVH was all the rage if you were a guitar player. Quite frankly, how dumb of me, what was I thinking? I really liked VH (and still do), but never wanted to play that kind of music. I never liked the Floyd Rose and for 15 years I had only that one Kramer (still have it), a guitar that never really stayed in tune. I removed the tremolo bar pretty much as soon as I bought the thing. But I never wanted to sell it, and I lived in a place where having a second guitar is almost unheard of, so I was kind of stuck with a bad guitar, and so my playing was very off and on. Had a few bands, but never liked the ego thing, I am more for balance and harmony and prefer to stay from unnecessary conflict, so never really got into the band thing too much, but jammed a lot with friends' bands, which always seemed to work well.   Anyway...   I bough a Schecter in 1999. Once again, I wasn't paying attention: I wasn't aware of the "shredder guitar" thing, didn't know about Korean-made guitars. The fact is that I developed a skin irritation that seemed to have come from the strings, but my fingers looked corroded like an extreme case of being under water too long, nothing was ever diagnosed but the thing was painful and I didn't play from 1999 until 2009. Until then, all I ever knew were the three months of beginner lessons and some failed attempts at re-starting. Too busy raising a family, working too much, no time, maybe you know what I am talking about: excuses. I felt bad one day, after answering "yes, I play a little guitar" to the casual conversation question "Do you play an instrument?" and decided that I did love playing music and playing guitar, and that it was important to me to keep doing it, but I also came to the realization that I would have to decide whether I was a guitar player or a guitar owner. I would not have to reach any specific level of playing, just do my best to

Fernando

Fernando

 

Our musical path starts somewhere...

Music has always been a strong presence in my life. It has always been around. There are lots of musicians on both sides of my family: my paternal grandfather played acoustic guitar; my mom's youngest brother plays guitar, there are professional musicians on both sides of the family, my parents are very decent singers, so is my sister, I consider myself very musical, my wife is a classically trained pianist (and she plays a lot, too), our children are very musical as well. I grew up with a ton of music: Beatles, Stones, Motown, Samba, Rock'n Roll, Jazz, Reggae, Flamenco, Zydeco, Fado, Gospel, Tango, Blues, Bossa Nova... My paternal grandpa played fun songs on his acoustic, Italian songs mostly, and I enjoyed his music, but it was my uncle, my mom's youngest brother, who really made me want to know more: he had an electric guitar, I can't remember which make and model, probably not a good one by today's standards, by I was fascinated by the buttons and controls and how loud that thing got! My uncle had a cover band, mostly Beatles and Stones, some other 60's stuff, really, really cool stuff. I watched a couple of Beatles movies and bought my first album (Help) at 8 years of age. At 10, I decided the Beatles were always going to be cool, but the Stones won my preference as my number one band. Along with Mick Taylor, Keith Richards, Ron Wood and Brian Jones, my two other main influences are Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix. I am not talking about who I have ultimately come to admire and learn from. I am talking about those who inspired me to pick up a guitar. By the way, guitar was my second attempt at music. I first started at 12, playing the piano, but I could not find one single blues/boogie woogie piano teacher anywhere, and my "classical-music-only-do-not-insist" teacher was strict and I left after a year, without having learned what I wanted. But I managed to learn something, and I did have fun. I found out I could figure out melodies, right hand in piano talk, and I also decided that I liked piano a lot, but it wasn't really the instrument I wanted to learn. That's when I started to listen to a lot of guitar music again, after a progressive rock period. All of a sudden my life was full of high gain music: Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones, AC/DC, JHE, Zappa, Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden, Van Halen...so I got myself a guitar. It was a Giannini (Jazzmaster replica) that was actually pretty decent; not great, but a good beginner level electric; got a teacher that was very cool, my friend to this day, and took lessons for three months, then I moved, sold my guitar and bought a guitar that was too much of a hype and almost ruined my musical life. It was the mid-eighties and EVH was all the rage if you were a guitar player. Quite frankly, how dumb of me, what was I thinking? I really liked VH (and still do), but never wanted to play that kind of music. I never liked the Floyd Rose and for 15 years I had only that one Kramer (still have it), a guitar that never really stayed in tune. I removed the tremolo bar pretty much as soon as I bought the thing. But I never wanted to sell it, and I lived in a place where having a second guitar is almost unheard of, so I was kind of stuck with a bad guitar, and so my playing was very off and on. Had a few bands, but never liked the ego thing, I am more for balance and harmony and prefer to stay from unnecessary conflict, so never really got into the band thing too much, but jammed a lot with friends' bands, which always seemed to work well.   Anyway...   I bough a Schecter in 1999. Once again, I wasn't paying attention: I wasn't aware of the "shredder guitar" thing, didn't know about Korean-made guitars. The fact is that I developed a skin irritation that seemed to have come from the strings, but my fingers looked corroded like an extreme case of being under water too long, nothing was ever diagnosed but the thing was painful and I didn't play from 1999 until 2009. Until then, all I ever knew were the three months of beginner lessons and some failed attempts at re-starting. Too busy raising a family, working too much, no time, maybe you know what I am talking about: excuses. I felt bad one day, after answering "yes, I play a little guitar" to the casual conversation question "Do you play an instrument?" and decided that I did love playing music and playing guitar, and that it was important to me to keep doing it, but I also came to the realization that I would have to decide whether I was a guitar player or a guitar owner. I would not have to reach any specific level of playing, just do my best to

Fernando

Fernando

 

Happy Day, Call from Ren.

Well I just got off the phone with Ren Wall of Heritage Guitars. He's the person at Heritage that Jay Wolfe and myself have been talking to about the different things that I wanted on my guitar. I guess Ren is one of the answer men from Heritage. Anyway we finally got all the details finished and the order is made. So know I just have to wait for Jay to give me the full price of the guitar so I can pay half. They told me in the begining that it was a third up front and then pay in full when done. But I would rather pay half now ( I paid 600 to get things started) so I don't have such a large payment at the end. The guitar that looks a lot like the 339 to me was the Millinum DC. So I got it in Trans Black, All Gold hardware ( Even the Knobs),and the Three P-90's ( Center one Reversed). Three volume and one tone ( Like on the Zephyr Blues Deluxe). I know that the Zephyr didn't do very well but I love mine and The sound of a 339 with the pickup set up should make this one tight sounding Guitar. I asked Ren for pictures for my Blogs as the guitar is being built so Y'all can share it with me.

StevenTari

StevenTari

 

Me, Myself, And I.

I started playing Guitar in Kearn's Utah. In 1972 I was in Kearn's High School And my best Friend Joey Stay's father had a music store that he named after his oldest son's band Strawberry Orange. My father at the time bought me used equipment because he didn't think we would stand by it very long.The first guitar was a Kalamazoo KG-2A and amp was a Kalamazoo 2 or 3 I can't quite remember. Between Joey and I we played at his church for the first time playing "Proud Mary".WE practiced together and had his brother teach me for a short time at his fathers store. I had to move to Miami after that. I tried to play with some bands after that when I moved to Virginia. But until I reached Graduation. I played in a band called the Virginians. But that was to area bars. I have always until lately only bought Gibson Family Guitars. My favorite is the Zephyr Blues Deluxe which I bought brand new in 1998.I have a Gibson SG Robot, ES-339, Epiphone PR-4E,and Hummingbird. I lost my other guitars a DOT from 65, and 12 string Hummingbird at a garden party. They stole the guitars but left the cases. I couldn't get another Hummingbird 12 string like I was looking for. So at the time another Forum I was looking at was bringing in a new guitar from France. The LAG guitar. So I decided to get my 12 string from them. I've got to the point why pay for a guitar that other people have and make a guitar that I want built for me my way. I was going to get a Gibson built my way from Gibson but I found it would be over a year ( Plus have to deal with someone out side Gibson to get it built. So I went to the people I talk to on the Gibson Forum. Automaticaly the responce was to get it built by an outside guitar builder. I looked at most of the Guitar makers the guy's were telling me to look at but most only made Solid Body guitars. I remembered about reading a bit of when Gibson had left Kalamazoo and some of their people had stayed behind and started Heritage Guitar. So I decided to check to see if they could build my new guitar. I hooked up with Jay Wolfe of Jay Wolfe Guitars. He is going to help me get my New guitar built. So here we go.

StevenTari

StevenTari

×