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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/26/2022 in all areas

  1. Gut shot! Haahhahah. This is my gal's Custom 50
    5 points
  2. This 2006 build needed some binding repair. This was completed by the master- Gary Hines (hinesarchtops) from the forum. The action is incredibly low thanks to Gary.
    4 points
  3. I went and checked it out today and bought it. It’s a one of kind hybrid custom ordered geetar The neck is fabulous in like new condition. I don’t know what pickups are in it - suppose the only way to really know is open it up and look. The transparent red is nicely flamed yet subtle. I don’t know what it weighs yet but with the belly cut it must be less than it would be otherwise. It didn’t feel overly heavy yet it felt solid. I’m going to weigh it tonight and take a peek under the pickup. It is documented as an H157 custom with all the paperwork in the original hard shell case that came with it. It has the matching flamed pickguard in the case with all the good mounting hardware. It’s never been put on so there’s no holes to mount it which is nice. The red flame is too nice to cover it or put holes in it. Thanks everyone.
    4 points
  4. 2 years ago, I sold my beloved 535 due to finances. Hated to let it go. Regretted it. I just managed to track down the current owner after inquiring at the store I sold it to. I was able to buy it back at a slightly higher price than I sold it for. But it included a new hardshell case. 2001 Almond Burst. I love it. Very happy to have it back! 😎
    4 points
  5. Nice one Gitfiddler, nobody here knows that is a Korina guitar with a 3 piece neck. When I was with heritage @ NAMM, when I went shopping with Jim Deurloo for wood and he was pointing out that was exactly what he desired, had a millie built with a top like that (I could not convince him to sell it to me), I then showed him what I like and he said.... "Buy it, I will build you a guitar from it" Here That one is! (Also Korina, White Limba) [img]https://i.imgur.com/bD5tBHk.jpg[/img]
    4 points
  6. Always best served in 3's
    4 points
  7. I think a Pelham blue H157 would look sweet. The Heritage Bespoke program could pull it off...if enough cash thrown at em. The 157 below isn't Pelham blue, but ya'll get the idea.
    4 points
  8. Artisan acid dipped tuners is a process I myself would rather not pay for. Why not let tuners and guitar age through play. Inside sources once informed me artisan aged was a way of marketing number 2's even at a higher cost. Interesting my almost 40 year old Heritage banjo tuners have a great aged appearance yet smooth as butter.
    4 points
  9. Cleaned her up and gave it the once over. Setup is perfect. Took some pics.
    3 points
  10. Remember I told you about my buddy with the tweeds. Well I was at his house yesterday and we had an amp party. Check out all the vintage amps on this wall (the only ones that aren't vintage are the Victoria Regal II on the bottom left, the homemade tweed princeton in the front, and the Marshall head on the right. But the guy is a killer amp builder so they sound GREAT... And we were rocking a '59 5E3, a '59 Pro, a homebuilt Tweed 3X10 Bassman here (along with a vintage Supro Dwight and a '64 Blackface Vibrochamp)
    3 points
  11. Those LE 157's came about after a conversation I had with Marv. I had this all mahogany H157 cutom built in 2010/2011, was on the fence about getting P90's or humbuckers. In the end I went with HB's, with the intent of getting a staple + P90 sister H157 built later. But while we were talking about the build, I suggested they make a tribute H157 based on the originals, that were all mahogany with P90's. Then the LE H157's came out a while later. I asked them to use the lightest slab of mahogany they could find for the body. It's quite comfortable to hold, not heavy. It's always irked me that reissues of the LPC weigh a ton. They only spec the heaviest wood for them. The 50's LPC guitars were probably not all heavy like that. The original LPC had a larger headstock, based on the Super 400 I think? So I asked them to use a Super Eagle headstock. I think it turned out very nice. Pic:
    3 points
  12. Update #1: I've added a second Heritage to my collection. I picked this 2021 Custom Core H-150 with a nice a Tobacco Sunburst last week!
    3 points
  13. The switches control the Var-i-phase VIP system. You have both a phase adjustment and coil tap. They work like this: The 2 Lower Knobs (Looking down at Controls from playing position) Left:Master Volume Right: Master Tone Upper Knob is the Vari-Phase Control - On 10: In Phase, On Zero: Out of Phase. Note: Vari-Phase only works when Mini-Toggles 2 and 3 are Down Again Looking Down from Playing Position Mini-Toggles are #1 #2 and #3 #1 Toggle Up: Is Neck Pick-up Coil Tap Down: Tap Off # 2 and #3 Toggles Down is Vari-pHASE for Bridge PU #2 and #3 Toggles Opposite each other 1-up 1-down is "Stand by Dead" or Both Coils #2 and #3 Toggles Both Up is Coil Tap Bridge Pick-up! If you pull the wiring harness, you'll want to carefully map out the switches. It's not anywhere close to the standard 4 knob / Vol-Vol Tone-Tone with 3way selector setup. The nut should be standard Gibson style. The Heritage guys were all ex-Gibson people, and as such, that's how they designed their guitars. A V serial number indicates a 2005 build. The Serial number scheme is explained here: Date Your Heritage
    2 points
  14. Quite a few different potential variables here - a mass produced amp might be designed around lower voltages with longevity in mind; especially taking into consideration the smaller/cheaper components likely used within. Also, the speaker used can make a big difference in volume (or at least perceived volume) too... some speakers may have heavy doping or designed to be less efficient (lower sensitivity; either intentionally to get a desired effect, or potentially due to cheaper construction). For beefier transformers; bigger transformer shouldn't directly correlate to volume, but rather more so tone potential (and some level of interactivity with the power tubes and distortion). A smaller or poorly designed transformer can crop off or fail to reproduce as wide of a range of frequencies... of course, we could be teetering into cork sniffing territory here... in some scenarios, size doesn't really matter and/or a smaller OT might be intentionally used to get a certain desired effect (so bigger doesn't always necessarily mean better). The construction/design of the transformer may have a more noticeable impact - a mass produced amp could use an output transformer with a winding ratio designed to not push the power tubes too hard (for longevity and/or less distortion), which could mean potentially lower volume (like using a 5k primary/8ohm secondary instead of a 3.4k primary/8ohm secondary). Again, lot's of variables here, just sharing some overly generalized feedback. Again though, lot's of potential variables though... sometimes it might just be some boutique goodness coaxing you into turning the volume up just a little higher.
    2 points
  15. Dan, I'd rather drive to your studio and do the shooting and vidding there, or have you stop by my home in Heber and shoot there. Your superior skills are needed. Plus we can have a ton of fun being gearhead rascals... rolling a bunch of amps and Heritage guitars. RE: the Fane speaker thang...no, you don't need that brand and model of speaker to get the Hiwatt sound, today, in my opinion. I have an old fane ceramic of the type that was used in the old Hiwatt Cabs, it's a wider range speaker than most guitar speakers, almost like an Altec in it's frequency response. I also have a Fane AXA 12 alnico, that model is more musical sounding in distortion than the ceramic one. For the money that one went for it had better sound good! I've noticed in my readings that there is way too much following the herd amongst the Hiwatt owner community IMO, particularly on the speaker thang. Today more choices are available than in the older glory days. You'll need to spend some serious money, though. The Scholz sugar cone is the make and model of boutique speaker expressly designed for Hiwatt amps, if they are still being made today. The Harry Joyce amp builders came up with it a few years back. The Hiwatt centered tone chain needs some semi serious money to do up with integrity, unless you are an amp crafter...But still lots of money. The thing that floors me about both my old Hylight PA head and particularly about 90's Harry Joyce head is how you can use then as a clean pedal platform and how gorgeously those circuits express effects through the speakers. Hiwatts make effects sound better than they should, magical, particularly distortion pedals. If you are jonesing to own a Hiwatt, know that they are among the loudest amps built for their wattage ratings...strongly consider to get one made for you by HI-tone here in the USA, hugely respected boutique builder, or have Nik at Ceriatone do one up for you...but have it built with an effects loop. You'll spend a grand or two less than for a vintage unit and get great tones and reliability. Why? Because the use of an effects buffer in a simple interrupt effects loop, particularly a tube C-lator or solid state, very compact Klein-u-lator from Ceriatone... will allow usable venue volumes with all the "loud amp" tone goods and then some. Fuchs makes a tube reverb pedal that works like an fx buffer but also has reverb built in... nice sounding and pretty slick build, but again, $$$. The tones won't be rolled off on the top like when an attenuator is used, and power tube tube life is unaffected, unlike when using an attenuator. Attenuators can not only destroy tubes over time, but are hard on power transformers and some circuit parts, overheating causes problems. You choke the chicken too much it's gonna die. Boutique amps for boutique guitars! Boutique guitars for boutique amps!
    2 points
  16. Ditto Without this Forum in what 2006, it was difficult to even find out about Heritage much less know what options were available. We at the HOC educated both our fellow members and the builders what options were doable. This was a moving target as I for one relished the "new build" threads and was most eager to tease one of my own. Wider headstocks, assortment of inlays.... That was a golden age for sure.
    2 points
  17. I never top wrap my strings but here are a couple of good reasons to consider it, if top wrapping is your thing... 1) If, like Bonamassa, you want to use heavier strings (in his case 11-52s) the top wrapping decreases the break angle over the bridge and lengthens the string thus decreasing the overall string tension. So in JB's case, 11s feel like 10.5-10 ish gauge. If you use a lower gauges like 9s and top wrap, I have heard that because of the less break angle and less tension the strings can pop off the saddles when bending like the issue on Fender Jazzmasters & Jaguars which were intended for heavier strings back in the 50s. 2) If the neck angle of your guitar is way off and you can't get the strings to pass to the stoptail without hitting the back of the tuneamatic bridge and don't want to raise the stoptail WAY off the top of the guitar to compensate. Personally, I hate having the stoptail more than a millimeter or two off the top of the body so I just use Faber locking ABR-1 bridges and locking stoptails.... problem solved. Wildcard: I have heard very conflicting and subjective opinions on a tonal difference of top wrapping making guitars sound thicker and beefier... this is up for you to decide. So Duane playing a lot of slide guitar wouldn't have the strings popping off the saddles, and Billy G used heavier strings (before BB King set him straight) and probably liked the slinkier feel of top wrapping. YMMV
    2 points
  18. I had one of those in blue with a maple fretboard. I don't know what year the guitar was. I bought it from George Gruhn when he lived in his parents home in Morton Grove Illinois. Good times.
    2 points
  19. I believe a "rocking bridge" creates issues with the bridge posts tilting on a solid body but on a semi: excess downward force could sink or compromise the top. As Ren has seen 60 years of repairs coming back due to such, his advice is preventative. The Farber system / posts address the first part of the problem. Nashville bridges being wider, can be problematic if the strings leaving the saddle rests on the rear of the bridge when the neck angle or top carve is not optimal. Raising the stoptail or going to an ABR-1 are a couple of ways to prevent this but have associated costs and to some would not be considered with parts not factory stock. But top wrapping is a no cost solution.
    2 points
  20. I seem to remember that Ren invented the TP-6 with the fine tuners.
    2 points
  21. The break was well documented on the HOC. @smurph1was crestfallen. His guitar did a faceplant into the stage from a stand. Probably in '08 or '09. Congrats on reuniting DetroitBlues!
    2 points
  22. I seem to recall Bob having a midi loaded guitar and using it to play sax sounds at PSP. Was I dreaming that? I looked through some of my old videos but didn't find any.
    2 points
  23. I'll share a little tip that I've been using lately for old stock tubes... Tube Depot is selling used "NOS" tubes at very reasonable prices. It's a bit random on what you'll get, but I've taken the gamble a few times now, and haven't lost a bet yet. Way more trustworthy source than the typical ebay or TGP peddler. 12AX7 screenshot example, but I've gotten some great 6V6 and 6L6's too (got enough to hold me for a good long while now).
    2 points
  24. I compared my favorite Les Paul custom shop '57 GT RI to my standard Heritage 150 with ThroBak SLE 101s. I traded the gold top for a 535. Win/win.
    2 points
  25. I agree with that , my CC H150 was a little warmer than any of my Historics. I have Alnico 2 magnets in those which have more bite than a A3. I love my Custom Core.
    2 points
  26. Oh my!! Block inlays, bound headstock, great figure, and vintage wine burst! Nothing to improve on there! Beauty, Paul! Enjoy!
    1 point
  27. A personal favorite. That one's done right!
    1 point
  28. I believe they're Golden 50s. Their DC reistance is very similar to Seymour Duncan 59s, and I'm fairly sure they use Alnico 5 magnets. Schaller stopped making pickups a few years ago to concentrate on hardware.
    1 point
  29. HRW pickups will have a sticker that says Heritage Guitar Pickup by Rendall Wall. Those are the original Schallers, which are a wax potted Alnico 5 pickup that Heritage sourced from Germany. They are similar to a Seymour Duncan 59 which is what Heritage switched to when Schaller stopped making pickups. Having an S serial number would make it a 2002 model. I have a 2003 H-157, shown here:
    1 point
  30. Interesting.... it's got a 150 body with a 157 neck. I'm guessing it was a custom build that someone liked the block inlays and bound headstock. I like the binding on the headstock, the block inlays vs trapezoids is an either/or for me. Also, the H157 has binding on the back as well as the front. This one doesn't. The best place to check would be the sticker inside the control cavity. They usually make note of special changes, like pickups, etc. Have the shop check it, or better yet, just drive down there and check it out. I remember driving out to Music-Go-Round to check out a guitar for someone who was interested. I took pics, and gave it a bit of a run thru, just to look for obvious problems. If you're spending that much money, it's worth having it in hand whenever possible.
    1 point
  31. The photo of the top front of the headstock may be a distortion, but it appears that the binding is separating. I'd ask for another photo from the seller.
    1 point
  32. It's dangerous to drink beer in the company of guitar builders This. Been there! 😂
    1 point
  33. Can you please turn that red down you're burning my eyes! hahahahaha Really is that the same guitar????
    1 point
  34. Yeah, amazing in hindsight. After years of scrounging & only being able to afford used guitars, it felt good to buy a brand new instrument & support them more directly. I guess I did get my P90 Heritage in 2013...but I got sidetracked & it ended up being an H357 instead of the H157. It's dangerous to drink beer in the company of guitar builders
    1 point
  35. the twist and turns of this post has me confused, is the Legend the 140? What I find remarkable about that one is it looks closest to the 1951 prototype of the first solid body Gibson in the natural finish
    1 point
  36. I can't recall ever seeing a faked H-157. They haven't made the 157 for several years, and at the time, they weren't commanding any special prices or even any special prestige. A large percentage of guitar players still have never heard of Heritage. 99.999% of them have heard of Gibson and Fender. There's much less of a market for Heritage guitars vs a Gibson. Why fake a guitar that is more difficult to sell, and probably will sell for 20-30% less money?
    1 point
  37. Phonetic spelling of "a fake."
    1 point
  38. These last few posts have been chocked full of missing context, lol. Hopefully someone can come alone and shed some light on the mystery soon.
    1 point
  39. None of those brands are junk. It would be helpful to see the trademark stamp on the underside of the tuner. Then we could trace the manufacturer.
    1 point
  40. Brent mentioned that he was unimpressed with the tuners on his. He called them total crap. How can a guitar in this price range be outfitted with junk?
    1 point
  41. What about mini hums
    1 point
  42. 1 point
  43. Different headstock size, different headstock inlay, '59 neck carve, different neck angle, Parson Street pickups (A3 wax-potted 😠), weight limited *, Heritage tuners **, deluxe case. *Make sure you check the weight, as all Cores were supposed to be under 8.5lbs. A reputable dealer told me that Heritage notified them 6 months or so that Heritage will no longer guarantee the weight limit of 8.5lbs ** The Heritage preparatory tuners look cool but they SUCK! I had two of them strip out in the first week. Luckily, GOTOH makes a direct fit replacement tuners but you shouldn't have to buy new tuners for a new guitar. I feel this may be due to the "aging" process they put the tuners through. I'm not sure this will be an issue for the NOS Cores tuners. For me, the artesian age and weight limit was the reasons I got a Core. It's the feel of an old, vintage guitar (and look). My Aged Core feels, and is acoustically more resonate and drier sounding. Through the amp this translates to grittier tone... the whole "a Tele on steroids" tone. If it weren't for the artesian aging and the weight limit (mine is 8lbs 6oz), then I wouldn't have bought a core.... so the extra cost was WELL worth it for me. YMMV
    1 point
  44. He got that 18" orange burst H-550 thinline with a Seth Lover and a MIDI from me. The Heritage workers all signed the back under the clear coat. Some studio musician in NYC custom ordered it. It was beautiful and huge. That guitar didn't look that big in his hands.
    1 point
  45. This is my second CC H150. I have had over 15 Gibson Les Paul historics. The CC H150 is a very very nice guitar.
    1 point
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