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  1. I was searching for a H-150 in the 8.5-9 pound or less range. A friend from another forum tipped me off to a couple on sale at a local GC. Since I had to return something anyway, I took a look. They had this one and an OSB model. This one was just under 9 pounds. The OSB was just over 9 pounds. NOS 2019 floor models marked down significantly with 0% 24 month financing. Not a bad deal. I got them to throw in a setup which they reluctantly did. I was looking for a Dirty Lemon Burst since I already had a Cherry Burst, but the deal was right so I took it.
    7 points
  2. Short history: Heritage was formed by former Gibson employees after the company left Kalamazoo. The owners were Jim Duerloo, Marv Lamb, Bill Paige, JP Moats, and Mike Korpak, who left shortly after the company started. All were in some type of management roll at the time. All had been longtime employees of Gibson that simply didn't want to move to Nashville. They bought a bunch of the equipment that Gibson did not take with them, and moved into the same building at 225 Parsons Street. This happened in 1985. Some of the owners had started with Gibson in the mid and late 50s. Ren Wall joined them, after being in various positions at Gibson. Their designs were obviously Gibson inspired, although they dipped their toes into other styles. They kept the old style of manufacturing, staying with hand building rather than having machines do most of the work. About the only real "automation" was the duplicarver that carves tops for the various guitars, although it's basically a pin router that rough carves tops one at a time. Things stayed pretty much the same until 2016. At that point, changes began to take place. JP had retired, and sadly passed in 2015. All of the owners were getting up in years. A local real estate company bought the building and purchased Heritage. Half of the company was sold to Bandlab, a company from Singapore who also owns a lot of other musically related entities. They are a larger musical instrument retailer in SE Asia. They bought Sonar after Gibson tossed it in the trashbin and built it into Bandlab recording software. They own Guitar Magazine. In the process of refurbishing the building, they moved the guitar making operation from the basement of the original building to a part of the building that Gibson had built in the 60s or 70s. (At one time Gibson basically owned the entire block). There was an incident with some longtime employees, some were let go, and others left in protest. I won't go into the issues, as I wasn't party to any of it. Suffice to say, new employees were hired. They brought in some good people to manage the operation, while keeping the original owners. Marv and Bill have since retired. The last I heard, Jim was still coming in, but it's important to realize that these guys are getting into their 70s and 80s. Pete Farmer, who had worked for Heritage previously was brought in to oversee manufacturing. Edwin Wilson was brought on board from Gibson's custom shop. In relocating to the newer part of the building, the company kept the process and old equipment, but updated the area in a lot of ways, especially in safety. An extensive dust collection system was built, a new sealed spray booth was built to minimize dust contamination of the finish and keep the employees from breathing toxic fumes. A premium was put on consistently high quality, which had varied some over the years. They are still hand made, but all reports are that the quality is much improved. They contracted the product line to concentrate on the better sellers, H150, 530, 535, 575 and Eagle. The 137 was in the line until this past year. Bandlab also owns Harmony Guitars which are built in the same building, but have CNC cut bodies and necks and then assembled. I think the company is stronger than it has been in years, but at the expense of the almost family atmosphere of the original company. That's not a bad thing. Had the company not been sold, I'm sure the next step would have been to close the doors.
    6 points
  3. When the new group bought out the original Heritage they dumped a lot of their smaller dealers. That caused some hard feelings. I understand that. It isn't the same company these days. I can appreciate that they are building some very nice guitars now. I am glad they are. I think there is a band wagon going through that has a sign that says the new Heritage Guitar company build better guitars than the old group. I will not be riding on that wagon. Three of my friends and I have 10 Heritage Guitars between us. A 550, 3 150s, 3 535s, a 475 and two 137s. Only one of these was built after the old guys left. Buy used young man. A original Heritage will be a fantastic guitar.
    6 points
  4. On this forum, I always felt uncomfortable saying what I did about the quality flaws of the older guitars, but there is NO doubt to me, that Heritage is building the best guitars they have since I've known of the company. Yes, some of the older ones are killer, especially some of the custom jobs I've seen, like Pressure, MartyGrass, Yoslate, and Kuz have commissioned, but I've seen many of the older ones sold in stores with some terrible nut slotting, fret filing and monkey soldering, etc. My friend Eric was a Heritage dealer and he carried all the standard models, so I played many of them from the so called golden years (preBandLab), and many people that bought them had problems with them. I had to do extensive work on all 3 of my older Heritage H150s to get them where I wanted them, but they all turned out killer. I had to replace the nut and do fret dressing on all of them. I sold one because it was ridiculously heavy, but the other two I've kept for good reason. When I first started getting into Heritages you could find a good H150 for around $1000 and then go to work on it, so the old ones were a bargain, especially if you could find one with a weight and finish that you liked. And then for a few hundred dollars more, you could get, new wiring, pickups, and hardware, etc, and you had a seriously good sounding guitar. My older 2006 H150 smokes!!! I bought it for $1200 and then put about $500 more into it so was a SERIOUS bargain! But many of the new guard H150's and H530's that I've played, were turn key, and were both good sounding and playable with no modding at all. I think the company is building some great guitars, and although more expensive, are still reasonably priced. Yes I know many of you guys are pissed about the way bandlab took over, but I don't care what they did, as long as they build good guitars and provide good customer service now. I have been looking at custom cores but waiting till I find exactly what I want. It's a new company better to start fresh.
    5 points
  5. Long before there was a HOC, I went through a Brentston-esque phase of buying and selling guitars. And I mean a lot of guitars (hence Brentston-esque). I bought a shit ton few (hi, hon!) keyboards with just the profits I made flipping guitars. When one of our younger sons was still in a crib, my wife was complaining to me she couldn't manage to put the mattress down lower and said son was able to climb out of his gayly painted prison. She eventually realized the issue wasn't the construction of the crib, but the guitar cases I had hidden under it (and forgotten about) that were preventing the desired operation from succeeding. This led to a less-than-fun discussion, but I digress. Across all of those guitars that passed through my hands, not once did I ever think, "boy, this thing sure is heavy!" or "wow, this sounds fantastic for how light it is!" The ones I gelled with (I suppose some might say "bonded with") stuck around. The ones that didn't, well, I flipped them to fund other guitars (and keyboards and fun stuff). There are a few guitars I moved on that I wish I had back (<cough>Tonesucker(tm)</cough>) and a few that I foolishly moved out that I did get back (most famously, a Hamer Studio FM wrap-tail that...well, never mind, long story). At no time, however, did weight alone ever figure in to the calculus. I am sometimes amused when I read posts--here and elsewhere--of people saying "I absolutely will not consider a guitar that weighs more than <x> pounds!" What if it was the sonic equivalent of the second coming of <insert your own personal messiah here>? You wouldn't at least ponder the possibility? What if it also had a neck to die for? Still no? Fretwork that was sublime? Not worth considering, eh? An oddity in the wiring that allowed you to get exactly *that* tone you hear in your head? Nope, weighs too much, hard pass, I guess. The way I view it, any particular guitar should be evaluated as the sum total of the parts (or metrics), not on any one factor alone. But, well, that's me. And I'm a little odd. So, there's that.
    5 points
  6. While I so much enjoy speculation on this topic, wisdom tells me to be suspect as to the motives and findings of engineers some 70 years ago as their memories and stories differ over the years. Most likely 99% of HOC members have zero experience BUILDING G type guitars. Legend is protypes were assembled in various thickness of mahogany and maple to balance sustain and brightness or sweetness. What I absolutely remember is from 2013 is a discussion with Marv and Jim on my 147 build. They started building LPs 5 years after the prototypes, but they combined to over 100 years experience building LP style. The 147 is a little smaller and thinner than a 150. I wanted a maple cap. My 137 is korina which according to Forum Lore, brings out the sparkle from P90. Since my 147 was to have a P90 bridge pickup I wanted a korina body which (I was told) is also lighter the mahogany. Marv lead me to one to their lumber storage rooms and we/he picked out their lightest korina board and sawed off a slice for the body and presented me with a piece/sample. Marv and Jim asked me how thick I wanted the korina? Both said the thicker instrument would be better (sustain?) I agreed with "thicker" as both founders were know to have disagreements on several aspects of "sound". They never mentioned how thick the maple should be or the carve. Some 5 months latter I picked up my tuxedo staple 147. I miss those days and suspect a lot of HOC members do as well.
    5 points
  7. My opinion is that Heritage has made great guitars since their inception. But they also had some lemons. That meant that the buyer needed to evaluate the individual instrument. The HOC was very helpful in that regard, at least in the used market. Members provided reliable opinions to guide purchasing. The new Heritage has better consistency but a narrower set of choices. Nothing wrong with that. Here are some of the unusual builds from the earlier years that show off the old guys' versatility and quality. Their reputation was primarily by word of mouth back then, some of it good and some not.
    5 points
  8. What's up all, I'm new to the Heritage owners club and couldn't be more pumped up about this guitar I've come to love! Quick background on me: I've been an acoustic snob for the last decade and just in the last year started dabbling in electric (what in the hell took me so long to get around to electric...idk). Since the time I got my feet wet I've completely plunged in the deep end and now eat, sleep, and breath electric. I've got tunnel vision for the Blues right now. After going through 5 electric guitars in less than 12 months I stumbled into a local shop that had this gorgeous gold top (my favorite look) hanging behind the counter made by Heritage...who I had never heard of before. I had been bouncing between Epi, Fender, and Gibson and wasn't able to settle on any of them. So not knowing Heritage I figured I'd plug it in to a Delta Blues 115 and see how the neck felt. Until this guitar I hadn't played a neck sweeter than a 2010 Clapton Strat, and that thing was buttery-smooth (the radius I wasn't a fan of, however). As soon as I put my hands on this H140 it immediately felt at home, like an old friend. The sound perked me up even more, it was a perfect mix of subtle warmth and twang coming from the '61 Gibson Humbuckers the previous owner had installed. The cherry on top was the price. I new within the first few minutes the guitar was going home with me (and the Delta Blues came home as well) though I sat and played for an hour. She's got some wear and tear from the previous owner gigging with it (and prob the one before) but nothing that is alarming. I'd like to swap out the bridge and tailpiece, if anyone has recommendations I'm all ears. I also need to change the output jack and I think the pickup selector switch needs to be swapped out as well. If there's any recommendations or vids on this I'd appreciate it. The last cool little bit that cemented this guitar being mine until I turn to ash is it shares my 2nd daughters birthday! I imagine I'll pass it along to her one day. Here's my new favorite guitar: 1991 H-140 Gold Top
    4 points
  9. NGD! It's a 2021 Heritage H-535! Not a lot of flame on this one, but I really don't mind. I bought a set of Lollar Imperials for it, but honestly, the stock Duncan 59's sound really nice.
    4 points
  10. Is the mahogany on an 8 lb guitar the same wood as one on an 11 lb guitar? The densities are dissimilar obviously, so are they even the same sort of guitar? I'll stir up some controversy. The first is the question as to why mahogany was used for the Gibson then Heritage solid bodies. Mahogany was an established tonewood for acoustic instruments, which makes sense. But why use it as a large slab for a body? I can't answer that fully but at least in part it had to do with furniture manufacturing, which was a big industry in Michigan in the last century. Mahogany was plentiful, relatively cheap, durable, and didn't fragment and splinter much when shaped. Those who argue that it was chosen for tone have to consider that there is really no history of Gibson experimenting much with other woods with the exception of the maple cap. Korina is fairly similar to mahogany in properties and never was a serious contender to displace mahogany as the default building material. http://legacy.gibson.com/News-Lifestyle/Features/en-us/korinawoodmakesgreatguitar.aspx Gibson mahogany tended to be lighter in the 1950s. I don't know why that worked out that way. It could be the abundance of old growth, longer drying, harvesting from different regions, decreased shipping costs, or company preference for other reasons. As time went on, the weight tended to increase. Weight relief was a solution in part. Even in light guitars, like the Tele and the PRS SE 245, weight relief gained traction. The early Heritage H-150s often were about 10 lbs. Some claimed that extra heft enhanced sustain and created "tone monsters". That term obviously means different things to different people. The original concept of the LP was a maple cap presumably to give high density for brightness and sustain when placed on the current source of mahogany that was lower density back then. More recently commercial mahogany is available with density similar to maple. That raises the question as to whether the maple cap is now more of a tradition or for appearance. https://www.easycalculation.com/other/wood-density-chart.php One thing for sure is that lighter mahogany weighs less! It is easier on the shoulders and backs. Curiously, the LP Customs and some of the H-157s had no maple cap but had solid finishes. That suggests the maple cap was at least in part for appearance. I am very familiar with the book Beauty of the Burst and the extensive discussions on wood harmonics and choices. Even if those discussions were true, there is less relevance today because the signal chain is very different in the 21st century. Consider Fender for a moment. They used and use lighter wood and have an overall lighter guitar. Some say their popularity is due to a lower cost, which there is clearly merit to that. But it doesn't explain why Gibson couldn't compete with Fender with the Melody Maker and Les Paul Jr. back in the 1960s. Further, it can't account for the widespread use of Fenders among professionals, including in the fields of blues and rock. Here is a clip of Fender and Heritage. I personally like the sound of the Heritage better. But look at the audience. Is there a single disappointed face when Frankie plays the Fender? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFtdEkG_OoI Can the wood be too light? I was warned not to buy a G&L made of empress (paulownia) because of the low density and potential for screws to strip out. I got it anyway. It is very light, under 7 lbs. It has good sustain and seems durable. No regrets. To summarize, solid body guitar players tend to like less heft to their guitars, which is understandable. They draw the line in many cases against weight relief but embrace low density to achieve lightness. Contrary to this summation is that thin necks are not uniformly embraced, so the added weight of a heavier neck is acceptable. Finally, the infinite possibilities of the signal chain won't offset the loss of "tone" in a guitar of improper density. As I have discussions with engineers about the history of the structuring of electric guitars, it takes little time for them to ask enough questions to reach the conclusion that the tonequest is beyond physics and math and enters into the realm of aspirations, symbolisms, and intuitive beliefs. It is in this realm where passion stirs. On a personal note, I have H-150/157s ranging from less than 8.5 lbs up to over 11 lbs. All of them are excellent. It is a buyer's market for the heavier guitars. The market does change. Consider that Gibson couldn't sell LPs at the beginning. Those same instruments are going for huge sums now. The original PAFs were literally taken to the dump in large numbers in the 1960s to make room for the latest and greatest pickups. Back when I would do three hour gigs, quite a while ago, I used a weight relieved guitar, a semi-hollow. No one would have ever thought that was bad guitar despite its overall low density. That would never entered the realm of possibility of discussion. That was a different time. I apologize if any of this content is unsettling. I try to reflect the overlap of practical industry and marketing decisions at Gibson, and by consequence Heritage, with those instrument designers who did pursue tone as well as other aesthetics. The result wasn't the epitome of elegance (note the acrylic fretboard inlays), but was an excellent instrument that was reachable in cost to a large enough to be financially viable. Even with these compromises there were some failures among the many successes.
    4 points
  11. A little history lesson for those newer members... Heritage Guitars Inc. officially opened their doors April 1 1984. Thier first singlecut solid body guitar was the H140...thinner body with a Florentine cutaway HERITAGE H140 It wasn't until 1988, when Heritage started building a "traditional" singlecut LP style guitar....the H150. 1988, 1989 and early 1990, the H150 body was exactly like a Gibson Les Paul. Rumor has it, that the first batch of H150s were built using leftover Gibson bodies. In 1991 Gibson threatened to sue Heritage over the H150 and the H357 (firebird)...so Heritage altered the design slightly to avoid the lawsuit. The H150 horn cut was altered to its current design. CURRENT H150 BODY 1988 H150 BODY I recently acquired one of these early H150s...a 1988. It was built in March of 1988, so its one of the early ones. Its a clownburst with a monster top. A nice extra is that it has a pearl inlayed logo...was probably a custom order. It has a 60s neck and weighs 10 lbs. It came to me with gold hardware and no pickups...so I upgraded it to Tonepros locking bridge and tailpiece, locking grovers and a set of VanZant PAFs. Plays very well. Has great LP tone!!! A great piece of Heritage history!
    4 points
  12. Nobody was supposed to know a certain retired English professor possessed of a split personality clandestinely controlled this account as an outlet for his more crude impulses. All these years everyone thought it was someone else entirely. Someone whose impulses were all, and exclusively, crude. Or worse. The jig is up. You've outed myself!
    4 points
  13. Got to do a better inspection today. Stripped it down, checked all the hardware, gave it a thorough inspection, conditioned the fretboard, cleaned and polished it since it hung in a GC, slammed the tailpiece, fresh top-wrapped strings, and double checked the setup. Only thing I found was the nuts on the tuners we're a little loose. She is ready to rock, now. Plays and sounds AWESOME.
    4 points
  14. Here's a quick 5 min video showing how they put the binding on the sides of the fretboards, then the machine that trims them down to make the "nibs".
    4 points
  15. I still feel like it might be a preamp tube. I'd still want to borrow a known good working preamp tube from another amp and try swapping it around in the peavy. At the very least it will rule them out. Quick/easy check before diving down the troubleshooting rabbit hole any further. If you have another set of El84's you could temporarily borrow, worth a quick swap/trial there too. Anything beyond that, next step would be opening it up to start inspecting the circuit; not sure what your comfort level is here, but the ever important precursor to this is draining the caps before you do any form of poking around... if you're not feeling good about it, I'd stop here and take it to a tech. Else... For visual inspection, I'd start by looking at the components around the power tube socket; as Mav said above, a blown screen resistor is a possible suspect, and isn't all that uncommon to happen - you'll notice the burn marks around the resistor (if it hasn't popped like a fuse entirely). Next, I'd look at the large capacitors and see if any have swelled or appear to be leaking. If nothing is visually obvious; well, then it's multimeter and measuring time. Maybe we'll cross that path again with a deeper dive if/when it comes to it, lol.
    3 points
  16. Happy New Year! I played Stella by starlight with my Sweet16. If you have time, Please listen to it. note: My YouTube channel is not monetized so You can watch it without comercial movie!
    3 points
  17. I have to do that to almost all of my guitars, except my Gibson L5s guitars, because those 5 piece necks are just plain solid!
    3 points
  18. All of Seacup's posts are ghosted.... Always have been.
    3 points
  19. Fudge yeah! I have been waiting for this. Brent's DNA is all over it, but it has been sent to the lab. He's going down.
    3 points
  20. Just slightly off course discussion-wise - weight may be a factor with regards to tone and sustain, but there are other factors involved in the issue, such as construction, hardware, etc. I'm sure that encountered guitars that were pretty light, and still sustained into tomorrow, and heavy guitars that sounded just plain dead. As for the discomfort a heavy guitar can give you - my main gigging guitar for most of the 90s was a 1980 Gibson Howard Roberts Fusion. It was a semi-hollow, and was quite the tone monster. You'd think it would be relatively light - wrong! I took it to work one time, and weighed it on a calibrated scale. It weighed 13.5 lbs (courtesy of its larger than a Les Paul sized body, combined with a maple center block the entire length of the guitar [the early 'Fusions were notorious for being boat anchors]), which explained why by the time I got to the 3rd set, it felt like my left shoulder was ready to fall off. After playing that guitar for years, I felt like I had no reason to complain about guitars that weigh 10 lbs - especially when you consider how heavy a bass can be. Ellen - it's been a while for me, since I've been here
    3 points
  21. A buddy's father owned a '59 Les Paul. Even when I was 17 years old and in good shape I thought it was terribly heavy. It felt hard too. Solid! I remember that day also because my buddy was trying to be a big shot and gave me a condom. I used it on his girlfriend the next week... but that is another story. When I got my black 150 in '90 it was just as heavy as the '59. It was just as hard and solid. I popped my skull many times taking it off or putting it on. It hurt my back playing it. I sold it and a Fender twin because they were too heavy to take around or play. Of all the Heritage guitars I have owned or played since they were all very nice guitars but the old black 150 didn't need an amp to sustain. Marv told my dealer they built two of them so Roy Clark could choose one. I didn't believe it until about a year later when I saw Roy playing an identical guitar as mine on Hee Haw. Later, in person, Marv told me that Roy had set it on a dresser in a hotel and it fell and cracked the headstock. That was one heavy guitar. We called it. "The Piano."
    3 points
  22. Thanks for the replies so far. Im not so worried about the guitars so much as is the company or maybe both. I have 1 heritage and it’s great. Just thought I’d get another and to hear what I heard today caught me by surprise cause they used to say Heritage was better than everyone. I also noticed today that their models of Taylors they stock are on the lower end. I always try to support my local people before buying big box. They carry G&L, Taylor, now Eastman and Furch. Attached is a pic of my Heritage Eagle classic.
    3 points
  23. Are you able to crank the tailpiece down without the strings touching the back of the bridge? That’s always been my biggest gripe with Heritage, as I can’t stand top wrapping. Don’t care for the look or feel. But that CC is a sharp looker nonetheless. HNCCD!
    3 points
  24. I just weighed it. He told me it was just under 9 pounds. It's 8.6 pounds, so it's right where I want it.
    3 points
  25. Hi , I have just joined the group . I have retired from Melbourne , Australia to a small regional town but still get to play my H530 occasionally in an amateur band of old school mates. I have gone through a few guitars to find the one and the H530 is THE one for me .. light , great tone and no feedback at our realistic playing levels. The rest of the band love the sound too. My first introduction to Heritage was during a visit to Rudys music store in NYC in 2014. I went there to see the amazing array of new and vintage archtops . Played a few acoustics and then a 1998 American Eagle was thrust into my hand . I could not believe the acoustic tone as well as the nice "Johnny Smith" sound from the pickup . I had to have it , and the wife agreed , so it came home with a lot of care from the Air New Zealand crew. The AE does not get gigged and rarely leaves the house. From that day forward i was looking for my next Heritage but until a few years ago there were no Heritage dealers in all of Australia. Now there is a distributor and quite a few boutique retailers around , though stock is hard to find. Happy New Year from Campbells Creek , Victoria, Australia H
    3 points
  26. Put her on the carpet face down early this morning, removed the back baffle of the combo cab, removed the nuts and washers from the four studs. Plugged in my fave soldering iron and stuck a dry terry wash cloth under the work areas to keep molten material from falling on and sticking to the cone. Used the hot iron to remove the wires from the speaker terminals. It was then that I realized why it was a bit compressed and not super loud on the db meter...i had hooked up the 8 ohm tap when there was a 16 ohm tap available from the waaaay upgraded output transformer. The speaker I removed was a 30w rated 8-16 ohm 1962 vintage University Diffusicone 12. It was a great sounding, light weight speaker that delivered a full range response. That amp was magical in touch and tone while using a speaker never designed for guitar amp use. The speaker replacing it was. It is a much newer Tone Tubby Nashville 16 ohm with a 60 oz. "yank the screwdriver out of your hand" ceramic magnet. It is rated for 75 watts. Its sweet, velvet covered hammer palette sonically evokes the 60's 200w EVM 12s produced under the Altec Lansing label sitting in another cab. This time I soldered the 16 ohm tap. The diffusicone was a fantastic sounding speaker. The more efficient TT sounded significantly more more dynamic to touch, tight controlled attack clean as well as distorted, and still delivers the full range response of the diffusicone at greater headroom and max volumes as well. Kinda like putting a diamond earring in a pig snout at the TT wallet bite, but at the first note she sounded so fine I didn't care where the money went...
    3 points
  27. New Heritage owner here that lucked upon an older H140 and I couldn't be happier with it. A '91 Gold Top that shares a birthday with one of my daughters! She's got scars from her past but the sound she makes is buttery goodness.
    2 points
  28. Check the infinite flux capacitor. Set to 88 MPH use a variac powered to 1 Gigawatt. See you back in 1955!
    2 points
  29. 2 points
  30. 🎵To all the amps, I've, loved, before... 🎵 Eh, no comment.
    2 points
  31. Well I’ll put my 2 cents in. I’ve played light and heavy and in-between guitars (all LP type) and have found great (acoustic) sounding guitars in all categories. I have played two Black Beauties, a ‘59 and a ‘60. They were both heavy(ish) but I don’t know the weight. The ‘59 was very lively and the ‘60 was worthless even though it sold for $60K! There isn’t really a way to know if a guitar will sound good by weight, only by playing it will you know if it is good. I love my 150GT because it vibrates like mad and has a nasal tone I love and it weighs 9.6 pounds which isn’t really light. I have played with pickups in my guitars and have found they make a big difference in tone on the same guitar. The amp is a huge player in the tone of the guitar as well but it relies on a good guitar with good electronics. Electronics can’t fix a bad guitar and a good guitar can sound like shit with bad electronics. The magic of the Burst LPs was not just the wood but the electronics and the newly designed amps of the day. They all came together to be able to have sustain like never before and controllable feedback (which is beautiful). The big power in the amps back then blasting a guitar body just feet away did something that wasn’t really known in the early 60s and before. If a brand new Custom Core with unpotted pickups was in front of a 100 watt plexi with an 8x12 cabinet full of 25 watt paper coil speakers it would do the same thing as the original Burst. There is not anything about the originals that cannot be replicated today except the horrendous value. We are currently in the best time for great guitars, never have there been so many excellent guitars being built with such consistent quality. Here is what I know about trees and wood and my hypothesis: Trees that can grow in both dry or wet conditions will produce dense or light wood (respectively). A Mahogany tree can reach an immense size when it grows in a wet boggy area just like a White Ash will (swamp Ash). The wet grown tree will have larger pores and larger growth rings and when dried will be lighter than the more dense, dry land tree. Back in the day Ash trees were cut down to drain swamps and make farm land and the result was a cheap wood for Fender to make guitars from. Mahogany from Brazil was cheap and plentiful and often came from wet boggy areas. This was also a cheap wood for the G brand and used on their less expensive archtops and flattops and found a place in their new LP in the early 50s. The less dense wood typically is more resonant with the larger pores and made a great solid body wood that could sustain while being lively and also was not oppressive to pickup and play. The swamps were all drained and Brazil started limiting harvesting from their forest. Planed obsolescence became a serious quality issue in the 70s and into the 80s (for everything not just guitars) and the vintage guitars became known as the greats and a mystic was born. Now light wood is available from plantation grown trees that are grown quickly with fertilizers and irrigation and the clock can be rewound to the glory days. Aren’t we all lucky as hell.
    2 points
  32. Agree Don! Hard to pick a fave, but always fun to chat about it. Yoslate, I almost bought a Tophat super deluxe once: still kind of regret it! Was using a club royale but it didn't have the lower end oomph & grunt of the super deluxe. Sold the CR & was still on the fence when someone else grabbed the SD. Oh well. It sure sounded good.
    2 points
  33. I am blown away by what the used Heritage's are going for. I buy to play, not to sell. Ten years ago on this forum you could get anything for a good price. Not so much now. . I have a bumper sticker on my car that says "Capitalism Bums Me Out." Oh well, when I kick the bucket my wife and or daughter will benefit but I ain't selling yet. I will have a letter to each of them in the cases to not let shady guitar guys take advantage of dead guys' families. The old ones are great. My main two gigging guitars are both old Heritages. The new ones that I've played are also great. However, you can't get the H170 or H-162s or cool guitars like that new.
    2 points
  34. Depends on what's going on. For me, as of late, that's sitting in my chair, in front of the computer. For that, the Super Champ X2 with the Eminence Ragin' Cajun or, no kiddin', the Roland Micro Cube. Probably best tone ever for the stage, a Top Hat Super Deluxe 33!
    2 points
  35. Carr Rambler has become my favorite amp.
    2 points
  36. His mouth moves but the sound comes out of his pants.
    2 points
  37. Only an accordionist would look cool with that strap.
    2 points
  38. Too bad you can't "like" moderator posts!! You and DB both have had some zingers that deserved likes
    2 points
  39. Yeah, it's been a while. The H-535 went bye-bye about 20 months ago (I've finally realized that '335-style guitars are a big, fat "meh" for me), so I quite hanging out here. My favorite local guitar shop is a Heritage dealer, so when I asked a couple of weeks ago to try out a Les Paul (I've only had a few Les Pauls over the years, so I wanted something different from the Fenders I've been playing lately) with a decently chunky neck, I was pointed at a couple of vintage speced Gibsons, and several H-150s. Liking things a little different, I tried out an ebony H-150 Standard. It sounded good, and had a Medium C neck with just enough heft to make my left hand happy (thin necks give me a sore left hand - after some digging online, I found out the H-150 Standard's neck is around .870" at the 1st fret [a chunkier Medium C]). The Gibbys were a tad bit chunkier neck-wise, but sounded kind of blah, through the Marshall DSL I was using as my test mule, so Heritage it was. Oh yeah, and at a better price to boot! The guitar's on layaway at the present time. Then it will need the obligatory re-fret job with Jescar Evo Gold fret wire, since I have major allergies to nickel (which virtually all standard frets have).
    2 points
  40. I definitely miss those days. I could make the trip to the factory in 1.5 hours and went there many times to pick out wood for my customers guitars and my guitars many times. It definitely was a special time for me and I know many others. I can't get an order filled these days. Definitely Disappointed
    2 points
  41. As Lavern 23 asked a simple question, Is Heritage OK? Simple answer YES! We can still get the most popular models and they appear to be as good as ever! Can you get an array of customs at more than affordable pricing? NO
    2 points
  42. This can be (and has been) debated for the next 1000 years. It's really a matter of opinion I guess. The Heritage Guitar Co. that existed in 1985 is an entirely different one than what exists in 2022. Which is better or worse is just a matter of opinion. But, that can be said about any Guitar Co. really. It's like a Team. You may have an untouchable baseball team in 1995, but as the players change, so does the Team and by 2022, that Team is really only the same in name. It's now a whole different group of people, yet they still have the name. Can say the same thing about bands too- how many of us have seen bands on the Summer circuit at Fests, etc and you're thinking "I don't know who anyone on the stage is!" Some might hate 'em, but some might think the new music they're making is great, so they keep following the band, even though it's only the same band from 1979 in name. So- it's' a weird thing. All comes down to play it and you either like the guitar or you don't.
    2 points
  43. It weighs in at 8 pounds, 1/2 ounce. Setup wasn't bad at all. About a quarter turn tighter on the truss rod, verify intonation, and rock it. I might raise the bridge a smidge.
    2 points
  44. This is an '86 I owned. It was heavy as could be. I found the jacket in the dumpster with a lot of other shiny suits.
    2 points
  45. Ah, we share the same abilities it looks like. I also dig into the internals of amps and fix them or change them though I have not fully built one yet. I feel the same in that having a more intimate knowledge of amps has made me very fond of them.
    2 points
  46. It’s the ghost of the haunting mids!
    2 points
  47. LOL!!! Yeah lets hear it one more time: what's up with the 357? And did they ever make a magnum version? Maybe Skydog knows? Here, let me copy/paste a whole bunch of stuff from wikipedia... 🤣
    2 points
  48. Isn't ASB Antique Sunburst? I thought Almond Sunburst was ALSB. I don't own one any longer so this is just conjecture and speculation... Regardless, you've got a fine guitar there!
    2 points
  49. I took my dirty lemon to band practice tonight!!! It performed flawlessly!!! Wonderful tone!! It held tune very well over the 3 hour period.
    2 points
  50. Hello all, I’m new here! In real life two of my favorite things are coffee and guitar. I just recently bought a custom core h-150 in dirty lemon burst… I posted some pics in another thread, here’s one of the pics of from my NGD lol
    2 points


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