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Heritage Owners Club

zguitar71

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zguitar71 last won the day on November 20

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About zguitar71

  • Birthday 05/04/1970

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    missoula montana

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  1. Well it must be true, 2 is better than 1. A few topics ago I said it would be great if Heritage could make a guitar that would compete in quality with the best PRS and Collings make. It looks like that is happening.
  2. It’s just miles. They are one of the main airlines out of Missoula. Missoula to Seattle to Lihue, Kauai. It’s great, leave the cold and snow and darkness and arrive at 2pm in the warm and sun at 22 degrees north latitude.
  3. My entire life goes on my cc and every paycheck it is paid down to $0. I use an Alaska Airlines cc and my wife and I are using the miles to go to Hawaii.
  4. I always go for the plain wood guitars. I buy guitars to gig with and it usually isn’t long before my fingers rub through the finish on the top (I don’t use pick guards) and the finish gets dull from scratches. I want to pay for a good sounding and playing guitar but not for fancier woods. They are also much more attractive to thieves.
  5. Nice! The non aged is a great choice and is the one I would make every time. I just played two CC aged 150s on Thursday. They were excellent guitars. Both were light and resonant and perfectly set up. I’m very impressed by the new Heritage guitars. I also played a standard 150 and a 535. They were also set up perfectly and played very nicely. The CC guitars were noticeable lighter and louder (unplugged) than the standard guitars. I’ve owned PRS and G brand guitars over the years and the CC guitars absolutely would compare to their high end makes.
  6. I like the comments. The 525 works for me but I completely get that it may not be the right fit for others and the 530 is. I agree that both are killer guitars for sure. I with they still made the 525, at least not upon a custom shop request and big $. MatryGrass, nice tone and chops! Laying down some convincing arguments for the 530.
  7. So first let me say I don’t actually own either. I have played both and I do own an original 225 from the 50s and played many 330s. Assuming all things are equal like the bridge, tail piece and pickups I will always gravitate to the single cutaway 525 over 530. The neck is set farther out on the 30 (unless it is a vintage one) but even with that extra neck, the access by the body is luxurious on the 25, at least for me. When I have my thumb on the back of the neck I hit my knuckles on the horn of the 30 but have major clearance on the 25. The pickup selector is also easier to get to fast and not encumbered by the knobs close by. These are just my personal issues really but the functionality of the (2)525 is just better imo. The 225 and 525 are both out of production and the 330/530 just keep going so apparently I’m the odd man out with my opinions but since I’m over 50 I get to start playing the role of the stubborn old man.
  8. I love that Heritage is getting to the level of PRS. I’ve owned two of them in my life but I just cannot bond with them; however, they are so top notch in quality they were both hard let go. At $3500 a CC H150 is great considering the Gib and PRS custom shop or Artist are quite a bit more and I know the H150 is exactly what I can bond with.
  9. It’s probably the combination of many small things to come together to make the difference. They are both made with the same machines and jigs so the lighter wood must be part of the difference.
  10. I would say yes, definitely. I am back on the trails and can stand up and mash the cranks without any pain and I can toss the bike around like I used to. However, I cannot commit to going down hill like I used to, I don’t have it in me to ever go through this again so I take it easy and ride the brakes and control my speed now.
  11. I’ve owned 3 Heritages, a ‘99, ‘01 and ‘11. I had to do fret work on all three to get them more playable. The ‘11 is an H150, the fret work was very poor IMO and I had to do quite a bit of filing to get them to where they should have been. It never bothered me though since the structural integrity of the guitars and the tone was excellent and the cost was absurdly low for what you get compared to other USA brands. I certainly would never say that the “vintage” Heritage guitars are better or worst than the newer ones though.
  12. My experience with real world aging is the finish wears through long before they check. I have 4 guitars that I play very regularly and all four have the same wear patterns. The photo of my 150 shows zero checking but obvious wear through on the top and the neck has lost about 50% of the finish. Guitars take a long time to check with changing temps and humidity over time. I always thought that the relics were to mimic a vintage players guitar but, to me, they always miss the boat. They are too uniform in the wear they mimic. I have an 81’ Es347 with wear through and some checking and also some very pristine areas. I know it is knit picky but it drives me crazy to see the relic guitars looking too perfect. I could get into a guitar with a slightly dulled finish since I really don’t like a shinny sticky new finish but none of the checking stuff. It took about 2 years for me to begin to see wear through on the top of my 150 and about 7 years to get to this point.
  13. The speaker thing is interesting. One thing I like to do is play around with speakers because they can make such a big difference. Sometimes I like a 15” or a British or an American. They can all sound good in a particular amp but bring out different tones. It’s like changing your hair to suit your mood. I think it is fascinating that they didn’t notice the difference. I imagine once it is in the mix and it does what it is supposed to do it sounds great. They also weight next to nothing and have attenuation that can allow them to be very versatile. If they break down though you might have to send it to MIT to get it fixed.
  14. The venue dictates what amp I use. I only use “old school” tube amps even though one of them is only a few years old. I have a Tungsten Creamawheat that is great for jazz. It is a 20 watt tweed deluxe. I roll the tone knob back to get a warm tone and I jump the channels to lower the headroom. I usually start to get good warm tone about 3 on the volume dial with the other volume on 8. This is good for a clean tone that might break up if I really push it. This is good with a drummer and some horns and big bands. if there are not any drums or a small club I go to a 5 watt SF champ that I modified. I changed the tone stack caps to Marshall values and added a mid knob. This warmed the amp up and allowed me to play jazz at lower volumes than the stock amp would do, it was just too bright. If I tried to use the 20 watt amp in a small club I would be in trouble in no time. The 5 water is my most used amp. I use it in breweries and dinner club settings. Places where people want to see you but not really hear you. The 5 watter allows me to set the volume like the 20 watter so that if I push really hard it will just start to break up but 99% of the time it is clean. The volume is not too loud but I also always put a screen in front of the amp no mater what type of gig I’m playing. It is the fastest way to make friends with bar owners and sound guys. I am very curious about the new Fender Tone Master Deluxe for its ability to go very low volume but still be warm and it really isn’t very pricey. I’m a tube amp lover but this new solid state has me wondering......... The most important thing really is volume. I have found that low volume is super important and a warm tube amp get me the most compliments on my tone. I think most people remember this in a pleasing way more than they do the actual playing. It is sad but true.
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