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pusher

Heritage Vs. Eastman Archtops

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pusher    0

I started comparing the two brands - both get good reviews - and an interesting thing I noticed was that most Eastman archtops have a 1 3/4" nut and a 25 - 25 1/2" scale length. The Heritage 575 (which is the one I'm interested in) has a 1 11/16" nut and the more traditional 24 1/4" scale.

 

Have any of you played both? Can you comment on the differences in feel? String tension differences? It's going to be hard to play them side by side. . .

 

Thanks,

 

pusher

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Guest mgoetting   
Guest mgoetting

There is a subtle difference between the 1 11/16 and 1 12/16 nut. Finger style is fascilitated with the latter. There are some tunes where I need to wrap my thumb over to fret the A string while barring with my index finger. That can be a stretch with the wider nut.

 

The scale lengths personally don't bother me much. You need lighter strings for a longer scale to keep tension about the same. Another way of looking at that is that heavier strings feel lighter on a shorter scale yet will have more vibrating mass in the pickup magnetic field for more sound output.

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jazzrat    0

I've had an AR805CE and an Ar803CE.

Fine guitars. The 575 24-3/4" scale feels softer for sure. The neck on my 575 ('03) is a little

slimmer than the Eastmans. I like the neck profile on the Eastmans just a hair better

but all things considered I prefer the 575.

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111518    27
I started comparing the two brands - both get good reviews - and an interesting thing I noticed was that most Eastman archtops have a 1 3/4" nut and a 25 - 25 1/2" scale length. The Heritage 575 (which is the one I'm interested in) has a 1 11/16" nut and the more traditional 24 1/4" scale.

 

Have any of you played both? Can you comment on the differences in feel? String tension differences? It's going to be hard to play them side by side. . .

 

Thanks,

 

pusher

 

I have an Eastman (146TM) that I very much liked, until I discovered that it had a disfunctional truss rod. Make sure that you are certain that the neck adjusts before you buy an Eastman ... since I discovered the problem with mine, I've found reports of a few others with similar problems. Very disappointing, because the guitar is exceptionally resonant, light, has a very comfortable neck --and having the truss rod replaced is expensive enough that I really feel stuck --if I do the repair, I'll have more in the guitar than its worth, if I don't, the guitar, now with a barely acceptable degree of neck relief, is only going to get worse until it becomes unplayable, and I'm out what I paid.

 

The Eastman reminds me of a very high-quality Japanese guitar, except that it is all solid wood and carved, unlike many Japanese guitars which are laminated. It has that very "precise,""refined" feel that I associate with the top-of-the-line Ibanez guitars of the 80s, if you know what I mean. I don't own a 575, but I do own a 550 and an Eagle Classic, both 25.5 scale guitars. Unlike Jazzrats experience, my Eastman has a thinner neck than my Heritage Guitars. The 550 and Eagle feel very much like Gibsons --meatier, slightly less refined neck carves, much heavier body construction. Can't comment on string tension because I had different gauges on each of the guitars. Just different animals: I don't think you'd have to play them side by side to have a strong impression of difference.

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jazzrat    0

I thought of something else I might add. Depending on the tone you are after you may

prefer one or the other. Even though the 575 and the Eastmans were all carved guitars there

is a big difference in acoustic tone. If acoustic tone is a priority then the spruce Eastmans I had

both sounded better. Plugged in, the 575 kills them. Just my personal preference

for a more modern electric tone with some air vs an amplified acoustic tone.

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tulk1    35

Haven't played Eastman archtops. But their mandolins kick serious boootay! Very nice for the price point. High End PacRim.

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ingeneri    0

First, the longer 25.5" scale isn't a difference between brands, but size. The larger 17" and 18" Heritage Eagles have the same scale. The 575's shorter scale is more tyical for smaller 16" archtops (though the Sweet Sixteen has the Johnny Smith scaleof 25").

 

I've never owned an Eastman, but have played with several very good musicans who use these guitars exclusively. Great players, however, I find the Eastman's tone a bit to bright and brittle for my taste. Note, these were direct A/B comparisons with my Heritage in some cases, since these guys and I were using my amp.

 

Just my two cents, and I certainly don't begrudge anyone getting an Eastman. But I vastly prefer the more traditional Heritages (not a surprising opinon on the HOC).

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Patrick    0

Eastman is one of the largest and oldest manufacturers of stringed instruments in the world. They employ . . . (if that's what you want to call it) some extremely skilled craftsmen and craftswomen. They're initial foray into the guitar market here inthe US was a complete cluster f*** Just ask Jay Wolfe. Binding was delaminating . . . backs were opening up. And this was just what was happening in the container on its way here to the US. They've gotten beyond most of that and they are truly producing some fine guitars.. The problem is, our "fine American craftsmen and women" can't compete with $.95 an hour, loaded costs for this skilled craftsmanship.

 

I'm with Thundersteel and Will on this one. Eastman = Made in China = No thanks!!!!

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Guest HRB853370   
Guest HRB853370
Eastman is one of the largest and oldest manufacturers of stringed instruments in the world. They employ . . . (if that's what you want to call it) some extremely skilled craftsmen and craftswomen. They're initial foray into the guitar market here inthe US was a complete cluster f*** Just ask Jay Wolfe. Binding was delaminating . . . backs were opening up. And this was just what was happening in the container on its way here to the US. They've gotten beyond most of that and they are truly producing some fine guitars.. The problem is, our "fine American craftsmen and women" can't compete with $.95 an hour, loaded costs for this skilled craftsmanship.

 

I'm with Thundersteel and Will on this one. Eastman = Made in China = No thanks!!!!

 

One can argue both ways about Asian craftmanship. For years I had a Gretch drums endorsement. In the last ten years, I acquired two Yamaha drumkits, both top of the line and both made in Japan at a small factory where they employ drum craftsmen. It is even somewhat similar to the Heritage factory-a small number of skilled workers who know their craft. I changed my attitude about Yamaha drums after I learned about how and where they were made. I can now say I am not ashamed to say I play them, even though I still have 5 Gretsch kits, two of which are vintage. I will go out of my way to NOT buy anything made in China, no matter how difficult that may be. I finally had to replace my Norelco triple head razor which died. It was made in Holland, but the replacement I bought was made, you guessed it, China.

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Spectrum13    19

I have a 905CE Eastman. It's a great guitar. Super woods, trim and finish. I played a few and they differ quite a bit. Played wihtout an amp and was rather bright until I replace the pickup. It's not a Gibson design. When I visited with Bob Benedetto, Bob told me he was asked to set up their production. He did say they used his book on archtop construction and thus a very light instrument much like a B. Personally I like a Heritage neck carve and the Eastman neck is like a Benedetto which many people want. My 905 is an Eastman Sweet 16 and cost $2100 new. Not a bad deal but not a sweet 16.

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kbp810    4
Is this who you want building your guitars???

 

s-ninjas-large.jpg

 

I totally want a guitar built by ninjas, that would be sweet!

 

ninjas-with-guitars.jpg

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Kuz    74

Listen, Heritage is a CUSTOM SHOP.

 

I have a 555 Custom with a 1 3/4" nut width, so if you like that width then order a 575 with that nut width.

The 575 is 24.75" scale which TONS of jazzers have used with there ES175 guitars.

 

NOW here is the big Heritage difference.... the Maple top is SOLID CARVED MAPLE TOP!!!!

I love my 575 Custom, I love it so much I am going to post a pic of it!!!! (or two pics!!)

 

web4-2.jpg

webback.jpg

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Gitfiddler    107

Eastmans are nice instruments made by a company that previously made its mark producing violins, cellos and other fine stringed instruments.

 

However, with today's currency and trade imbalance between US and China, that works ONLY to China's advantage, I refuse to even look at an Eastman product. There are enough Chinese made consumer products that are unavoidable in today's markets. So when it comes to what I consider a luxury item such as a guitar, my hard earned dollars now go for US made products. OK, over the years I've bought and sold a bunch of high end Japanese made Ibanez guitars, but at least there is somewhat of a level playing field with that country. The only NEW gits I've bought are from Heritage, G&L and yes, Gibson.

 

I'll get off of my soap box now. Sorry for the rant. Now back to your regularly scheduled programming.

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mark555    22
Eastman = Made in China = No thanks!

 

Total support from me here, China is taking away our jobs - why let them have the guitar market? Every Chinese guitar we buy is one less USA/European product that is going to sell.

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smurph1    0
Is this who you want building your guitars???

 

s-ninjas-large.jpg

NOT ME!! LOL :D Communist B@sturds!!

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smurph1    0
Total support from me here, China is taking away our jobs - why let them have the guitar market? Every Chinese guitar we buy is one less USA/European product that is going to sell.

Amen Brother.. Every guitar and amp I own is made in the U.S...I've had plenty of foreign made instruments..But we need to try to keep American workers busy!! (OK I'm a hypocrite, I drive a Honda) but those people get paid well for their services, and they are a U.S. ally.. :D

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Spectrum13    19
Amen Brother.. Every guitar and amp I own is made in the U.S...I've had plenty of foreign made instruments..But we need to try to keep American workers busy!! (OK I'm a hypocrite, I drive a Honda) but those people get paid well for their services, and they are a U.S. ally.. :P

 

 

Two way street smurph. The USA lost a lot of manufacturing capacity to Asia plus we are addicted to lower priced goods and we still make $$ with UPS, logistics, wholesale, retail, installation....

 

Start up cost in the USA for some products would be prohibative, some process would not be a option due to polution issues. Should China loose their largest customer and stops buying our bonds, it would be game over.

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Every guitar and amp I own is made in the U.S...

 

Same here--uh, except for my Marshall DSL50 (made in the UK).

 

Oh, and my Peavey Vypyr and Danelectro Honeytone (both made in China, unfortunately).

 

 

But, I try to buy US-made as much as I can.

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smurph1    0
Two way street smurph. The USA lost a lot of manufacturing capacity to Asia plus we are addicted to lower priced goods and we still make $$ with UPS, logistics, wholesale, retail, installation....

 

Start up cost in the USA for some products would be prohibative, some process would not be a option due to polution issues. Should China loose their largest customer and stops buying our bonds, it would be game over.

Good Point..I guess the horse is already out of the barn..Thanks Wal-Mart.. Plus if they didn't buy all our bonds, we couldn't afford two wars..(wait a minute..Hmmmmm..) :P

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Halowords    0

Is this who you want building your guitars???

 

s-ninjas-large.jpg

 

Are they made by REAL NINJAS?!!!!!!!! If so, then . . . maybe?!!!! I thought Ninja were pretty much based outside of Japan though.

 

I totally want a guitar built by ninjas, that would be sweet!

 

ninjas-with-guitars.jpg

 

I can't even put the awesomeness of that picture into words. It reminds me of Real Ultimate Power. http://www.realultimatepower.net/

 

Slightly more serious though, I try to buy American, particularly something as small and craftsman-like as Heritage. They're a feel-good company to support for me, almost like a Ma-and-Pa feeling knowing it's just a smaller business of, by all reports I've heard, very nice people. Maybe the Eastman people are very nice too, but my support-American-Business stance, and lack of any real knowledge of Eastman, sort of push me to go with Heritage (because I've considered them both and that's my train of thought that led me to my conclusion). That and I like my H-150 so much (thanks golferwave!!!!!).

 

-Cheers

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Amen Brother.. Every guitar and amp I own is made in the U.S...I've had plenty of foreign made instruments..But we need to try to keep American workers busy!! (OK I'm a hypocrite, I drive a Honda) but those people get paid well for their services, and they are a U.S. ally.. :D

Most of the Japanese auto makers have domestic plants. Honda Goldwings were made in Marysville, IN for quite a while (almost 30 years) with production recently moving back to Japan in 2008 to their new motorcycle-only plant. With all the Japanese and Italian parts used in Harley Davidson bikes, I would barely call them "American". Toyota, Honda, etc etc all have US car production plants to help get around Customs, and some have been open over 30 years now. So, regardless of people may feel about buying a "Japanese" car, the people who get paid to build them are usually Americans. Part of this is also because cars that work in Japan don't sell here, and vica versa.

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