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Current bridge stoptail on H-150s’


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I remember the earlier “H” guitars used the metric Schaller stuff, but went imperial with the switch to Tonepros. Just don’t know with the post TonePros hardware.

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Received some information from Ren.

 

Currently they are using Pinnacle locking bridges ( aluminum with zinc saddles ) and aluminum stoptails.  USA made.

Factory said they are about to change what is installed on H-150s. 

I did a little research on Pinnacle and it looks like Metric from what I saw.

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31 minutes ago, rockabilly69 said:

wow that tailpiece is up high and yet the strings just barely clear the back of the bridge, or is that an optical illusion on my part?

Yeah, that's alot of stoptail bolt in the air with zero clearance at the back of the bridge.??

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19 hours ago, rockabilly69 said:

wow that tailpiece is up high and yet the strings just barely clear the back of the bridge, or is that an optical illusion on my part?

 

18 hours ago, loudtubeamps said:

Yeah, that's alot of stoptail bolt in the air with zero clearance at the back of the bridge.??

Yes it is. I've seen it before. Who knows what usually causes this?

By the way, this guitar plays like a dream and has a killer sound. Before I even plugged it in it had "that" resonance I like to hear.

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2 hours ago, skydog52 said:

 

Yes it is. I've seen it before. Who knows what usually causes this?

By the way, this guitar plays like a dream and has a killer sound. Before I even plugged it in it had "that" resonance I like to hear.

The neck angle typically 'causes it. If it gets above 4 degrees up goes the tail. Early 50's Les Pauls had the lower angle, when you tried to put an ABR on them and you had to slam the bridge and tail piece down to get them to work right. But, if it plays good and sounds good, it is good:) I'd top wrap it if it were mine. 

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It seemed to me that the neck angle also showed up with the bridge sitting up high as well.   That one doesn't seem to be riding above normal.

The amount of carve on the top will also change things.   Assuming they are still belt sanding the bodies the same way, there can be some variations there.    Watching them work a body with that slack belt sander was pretty amazing.    Too heavy of a touch and you could knock 1/4 inch off pretty quickly!

Edited by TalismanRich
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42 minutes ago, rockabilly69 said:

The neck angle typically 'causes it. If it gets above 4 degrees up goes the tail. Early 50's Les Pauls had the lower angle, when you tried to put an ABR on them and you had to slam the bridge and tail piece down to get them to work right. But, if it plays good and sounds good, it is good:) I'd top wrap it if it were mine. 

 

4 minutes ago, TalismanRich said:

It seemed to me that the neck angle also showed up with the bridge sitting up high as well.   That one doesn't seem to be riding above normal.

The amount of carve on the top will also change things.   Assuming they are still belt sanding the bodies the same way, there can be some variations there.    Watching them work a body with that slack belt sander was pretty amazing.    Too heavy of a touch and you could knock 1/4 inch off pretty quickly!

This one was definitely the carve. You can see it. Treble side is normal. 

+1 on top wrap. If it was mine I would do it also.

This is one reason I'm glad they are going to start carving them with the CNC technology. 

 

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It also looks like the saddles are cut a bit low (over-cut where the strings sit) as well.  Maybe buying some new saddles (or even buying higher saddles than what normally comes with this bridge, would help) and re-cutting them less could help.

FWIW, all the Heritages I have owned I changed to Faber bridges & stoptails.  Everyone (including the many I have sold) had correct neck angles and the strings cleared bridges and the locking aluminum stoptails could be cranked down to the body.

This guitar is a perfect example of why I (personally) won't buy a guitar that is top wrapped.  The owner would have to restring the guitar back to traditional style to allow me to see if the neck angle is correct and if the strings will clear the bridge.  If the owner won't restring it traditionally, then I will pass on it.  Top wrapping hides to many flaws in the guitar.

 

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Low E and the A string slots are cut deep and are far forward although the saddles are well in the middle of the bridge. Assume some work was done to match the radius of bridge and fingerboard. I replaced all my Nashville bridges to ABR (Faber) as the narrower width provides more clearance to the stoptails. IMO Nashville bridges allow more saddle travel needed when the bridge studs were drilled a bit off.  

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I remember when I didn’t obsess over these types of issues (like the tailpiece being up high). My attitude used to be like the old “Record Rating” thing on American Bandstand. “It’s got a good beat, and I can dance to it” was good enough for me. Well, not anymore as I find the weirdest most seemingly unnoticeable to the untrained eye bugs me. Snd hell, I can’t play worth a sheet either!!!

Edited by davesultra
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