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Heritage Amplification. THE PATRIOT


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Heritage Amplification.   PATRIOT 2x12 combo.  

45 watt.  2-6L6s.  Reverb.  2-Celestian G12H Anniversary’s.   
 

This amp is an absolute BEAST!!  Thick, tight bottom end, crystal clear highs and full mids    
I can’t wait to play this amp live!!!

 

 

FROM THE ARCHIVES….

Heritage Amplifiers of Tennessee is a new guitar amplification company owned by Maclane Corporation Incorporated.  The company was formed in January 2004 by Malcolm MacDonald and Lane Zastrow. Lane is a 35 year veteran of the music industry and a former Vice President of Sales and Marketing for the Gibson Guitar Company. Lane is currently heading up the sales and marketing of the Heritage Guitar Company of Kalamazoo, as he has done for the past 20 years.

The design team is headed by Paul Cochrane along with the cabinet design by Peter Mather. The line includes amplifiers which range from producing warm, fat, American tones, to the classic "midrange" crunch of British valve amps. Heritage amplifiers are as beautiful to look at as they are to listen to. All of our amps are built by outstanding guitarists for the most discerning players in the world who demand the very best in tone.

Heritage Amplifiers of Tennessee
Wilson Pike Circle, Brentwood, TN

 

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Edited by brentrocks
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FROM THE ARCHIVES…

 

The Patriot has 45 watts of power from two 6L6 tubes or two EL34's in a two 12" speaker combo amp. The amp goes from blackface clean tones to a tweed-style break-up. The Patriot is perfect for styles ranging from blues, country, jazz and classic rock.  

Control Panel:

Volume / Pull Bright: Controls the overall volume/gain of the amplifier. Pulling the volume control makes the amp sound "brighter". The "bright" function, in conjunction with the treble control, allows the player to tune the treble frequencies to better match the type of guitar and pickup position used. 

Treble: Adjusts the amount of high frequencies

Middle: Adjusts the amount of mid frequencies

Bass:  Adjusts the amount of low-end frequencies

Dwell: Controls the amount of signal level sent to the reverb pan. At lower settings, there is less reverb depth or decay, while at higher settings the reverb depth and decay increase.

Reverb:  Adjusts the amount of the reverb signal

Presence: Increases the gain of high frequencies in the power amp section

Mood: Adusts the amount of negative feedback in the power amp section. Lower mood settings will be tighter and more focused sounding, while higher settings will be more agressive sounding with a looser bottom end.

Back Panel:

Fuse: 3 Amp fuse housed within the detachable AC power connector

Bias pot and test points:  See biasing instructions

Speaker jacks: 2, 4 and 8 ohm. If you would like to use an 8 ohm extension speaker cab, please disconnect the internal speaker. If you have a 4 ohm extension speaker cab, you can use the cab and the internal speakers by plugging the extension cab and the internal speakers into the 2 ohm speaker jacks.

Combo Dimensions and Specs: 2x12 open back, pine cabinet. Width: 26.5" x Height: 20"x Depth: 11.25". The combo cab is loaded with 2 Celestion G12H30 speakers, wired in parallel for 4 ohm. The Patriot comes standard in burgundy with a cane grille. Please see our vinyl and grille cloth section for custom colors.

Weight: 63 lbs.

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What's the serial number on that one?   It's got the early style face plate.   The circuitry looks very familiar though.   This is from my Patriot, which I think it a 3P0 series.  

P1010200.thumb.JPG.b21d5ebda7bf695215c0db76951e73cc.JPG

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25 minutes ago, TalismanRich said:

What's the serial number on that one?   It's got the early style face plate.   The circuitry looks very familiar though.   This is from my Patriot, which I think it a 3P0 series.  

P1010200.thumb.JPG.b21d5ebda7bf695215c0db76951e73cc.JPG

I can’t find a serial number on this one?

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Mine is on a tube layout on the inside, and engraved in the chassis.   Your's is probably a 1st generation model,  I've seen 2nd gen models that had the black faceplate, but still had the bright switch.   Mine has a push/pull for the bright switch.

This one is a 2nd Gen version.  Notice the bright switch on the left.

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Edited by TalismanRich
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Nice first edition Patriot amp, Brent. 

My 2004 looks a lot like TRich's, but doesn't have the 4 screws on the front of the cab.  Mathers did the cab work for Heritage Amps, so there may have been subtle changes over the years.  

 

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The amp's are awesome for sure.  But 40 watts and 2x12 makes it a tough sell for use even live.  I had a 40 Watt Marshall DSL40C and even at 1/3 volume was way to loud in a large open space.  But this amp was designed long before the microhead, low wattage (20w or less) amps became a thing.  I'd love to have a Heritage amp, but without an attenuator, I wouldn't know when or where I could ever use such an amp.  I'm not knocking your purchase Brent, being in a live band playing outdoor venues, I'm sure there is plenty of space for the volume to spread out saving your ears.  Something like an Oxbox would do this amp wonders for achieving the tube saturation without cracking the foundation of your house or shaking the stage apart.

As far as Mather cabs go, a few years ago I had a Traynor Guitarmate IV 20watt tube amp, basically Canadian version of a Marshall.  Mather made a beautiful cabinet that fit perfectly.  Another one of those amps I wish I never let go of.  Great company to work with for sure if you want to recab or reconfigure your amp set up.

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22 hours ago, kbp810 said:

Great amp and great post

Love the way they wired the filament heater wires, very neat and tidy

A detail only a serious amp builder would notice I'd imagine.. 

So when does the Reverb store open for your custom creations?

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6 hours ago, DetroitBlues said:

A detail only a serious amp builder would notice I'd imagine.. 

So when does the Reverb store open for your custom creations?

Not to derail Brent's thread - but I have been working on a few things in my free time...

IMG_1616-X5.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

I noticed there is no gain knob! I have an old twin and that sucker will not break up unless you use a tube screamer, which is what Robben Ford did for a number of years. I suspect the Heritage is very similar in that one's ears would bleed before it would break up on it's own?

I used my twin for years with an Ibanez analog FX rack, the UE400, which either had a Maxon or a tube screamer built in. It was wonderful and for C&W, it was the perfect clean amp. I think the Heritage would probably be a good bet for that too. 

Another issue with the Heritage that I assume is similar to my twin is that it looks like it would be really heavy.....I mean really heavy. My twin has the old EV SRO coffee can 12s which are lovely but too much to carry. I always have my twin for sale but the price is set so high that I hope nobody buys it. If I had the Heritage, I would do the same thing....not something I would want to carry, but something I love in my studio for those rare times where I need that totally pristine sound that only  they can give.

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You are right, of course.    It will crank out a lot of sound before it even thinks of breaking up.   You certainly don't want to attempt it a basement or bedroom setting!    That's why they make 1253 different OD/fuzz/distortion pedals, for sale daily at Sweetwater.  😁 

I brought mine to PSP some years ago.   Since then it had resided in the basement, simply because hauling 65-70 lbs of amp up the steps, through the hall and kitchen and into the garage, then trying to lay it gently into a trunk was deemed to be hazardous to my back!    I bought a nice '65 Princeton clone instead!

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1 hour ago, TalismanRich said:

You are right, of course.    It will crank out a lot of sound before it even thinks of breaking up.   You certainly don't want to attempt it a basement or bedroom setting!    That's why they make 1253 different OD/fuzz/distortion pedals, for sale daily at Sweetwater.  😁 

I brought mine to PSP some years ago.   Since then it had resided in the basement, simply because hauling 65-70 lbs of amp up the steps, through the hall and kitchen and into the garage, then trying to lay it gently into a trunk was deemed to be hazardous to my back!    I bought a nice '65 Princeton clone instead!

I had a similar experience with my Patriot.  A few years ago I got called to do a jazz/RnB gig with a quartet at a venue that seated about 500.  Even though they insisted on using their dedicated sound techs, mike our amps and control volume from the house set up, I waived them off.  The mighty Patriot don't need no stinking SM57! 

At the rehearsal/sound check, the sound guy obliged me...at first.  I plugged in my H555 and cranked up the Patriot's volume just past 12 o'clock and rang out a few glorious power chords and funk riffs.  Next thing I knew there was a frantic sound guy running down the aisle towards me yelling "turn that f%&*@-ing amp DOWN!! 

That evening there was a Sure SM57 strategically placed in front of the tamed Patriot, with volume set at around 9 o'clock. 

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