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Heritage Owners Club

zguitar71

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Everything posted by zguitar71

  1. I never loosen the strings no matter how long between playing any one guitar. They are designed to have tension on the neck. I rarely take the tension off the neck. When I change strings (on some guitars this is weekly when I’m gigging a lot) I do it at one at a time. I have found if I take off all the tension then sometimes I will need to adjust the truss rod a slight bit. Leaving the tension on the neck does not require any adjustments.
  2. This makes small simple class A amps more appealing to me than ever. Three tubes will power one to glorious tones that a mic can distribute to an entire audience. Convert the amp to a solid state rectifier and the tube count goes down to two. It will also be loud enough for most of the small clubs without a mic. Once the tubes are out of the picture I guess I’ll have to go to the Fender Tone Master amps. It’s a shame they don’t make a Brownface Deluxe in that series.
  3. If it feels like it is in the neck then it probably is. Maple is a heavy-ish wood and some pieces are heavier than others of the same type. The large headstock can defiantly add a weighted feel since it is cantilevered out there far from the body. I doubt the binding and inlays add much weight though. The Mahogany stripes in the neck most likely decrease the weight, though not by much, compared to all Maple. The 175 has an all Mahogany neck and is going to be lighter because of that and possible feel more balanced too. The Johnny Smith may just have Maple that is lighter due to growing conditions or even a different type of Maple.
  4. It’s a big risk. I was told by an airlines (don’t remember which) I could carry on my guitar, an ES347 (335 size). When I walked down the jet way and got to the plane I was denied the ability to bring it on and given no choice but to check it. There is no guarantee you can bring it on other than buy it a seat of its own.
  5. Well I’ll put my 2 cents in. I’ve played light and heavy and in-between guitars (all LP type) and have found great (acoustic) sounding guitars in all categories. I have played two Black Beauties, a ‘59 and a ‘60. They were both heavy(ish) but I don’t know the weight. The ‘59 was very lively and the ‘60 was worthless even though it sold for $60K! There isn’t really a way to know if a guitar will sound good by weight, only by playing it will you know if it is good. I love my 150GT because it vibrates like mad and has a nasal tone I love and it weighs 9.6 pounds which isn’t really light. I have played with pickups in my guitars and have found they make a big difference in tone on the same guitar. The amp is a huge player in the tone of the guitar as well but it relies on a good guitar with good electronics. Electronics can’t fix a bad guitar and a good guitar can sound like shit with bad electronics. The magic of the Burst LPs was not just the wood but the electronics and the newly designed amps of the day. They all came together to be able to have sustain like never before and controllable feedback (which is beautiful). The big power in the amps back then blasting a guitar body just feet away did something that wasn’t really known in the early 60s and before. If a brand new Custom Core with unpotted pickups was in front of a 100 watt plexi with an 8x12 cabinet full of 25 watt paper coil speakers it would do the same thing as the original Burst. There is not anything about the originals that cannot be replicated today except the horrendous value. We are currently in the best time for great guitars, never have there been so many excellent guitars being built with such consistent quality. Here is what I know about trees and wood and my hypothesis: Trees that can grow in both dry or wet conditions will produce dense or light wood (respectively). A Mahogany tree can reach an immense size when it grows in a wet boggy area just like a White Ash will (swamp Ash). The wet grown tree will have larger pores and larger growth rings and when dried will be lighter than the more dense, dry land tree. Back in the day Ash trees were cut down to drain swamps and make farm land and the result was a cheap wood for Fender to make guitars from. Mahogany from Brazil was cheap and plentiful and often came from wet boggy areas. This was also a cheap wood for the G brand and used on their less expensive archtops and flattops and found a place in their new LP in the early 50s. The less dense wood typically is more resonant with the larger pores and made a great solid body wood that could sustain while being lively and also was not oppressive to pickup and play. The swamps were all drained and Brazil started limiting harvesting from their forest. Planed obsolescence became a serious quality issue in the 70s and into the 80s (for everything not just guitars) and the vintage guitars became known as the greats and a mystic was born. Now light wood is available from plantation grown trees that are grown quickly with fertilizers and irrigation and the clock can be rewound to the glory days. Aren’t we all lucky as hell.
  6. Fear not, they are great. It sounds like the dealer is mostly interested in selling Eastman guitars.
  7. Ah, we share the same abilities it looks like. I also dig into the internals of amps and fix them or change them though I have not fully built one yet. I feel the same in that having a more intimate knowledge of amps has made me very fond of them.
  8. I have felt that the amp is as or more important than the guitar. I also have a higher affection towards amps than guitars, though not much higher.
  9. I’ve played a few over the years along with the 330 and not found any to be neck heavy.
  10. From the album: zguitar71 - Guitars and amp and pedals

    © © Heritage Owners Club (2007-2009)

  11. From the album: zguitar71 - Guitars and amp and pedals

    © © Heritage Owners Club (2007-2009)

  12. Wow, I love the 150! Great color.
  13. zguitar71

    Rockin' Hamilton

    Rockin' this summer in Hamilton for the brew fest wearing the "Datsun" shirt, giving a hint to the "Z" and "71" in zguitar71.
  14. zguitar71

    Rockin' Hamilton

    From the album: zguitar71 - Guitars and amp and pedals

    © © Heritage Owners Club (2007-2009)

  15. Nice golt top!, my dream guitar right now, Love the lollar p-90's.
  16. I have a Super Eagle and I never play it any more because of the size. It is a real shame because the guitar is very nice. I use my semi-hollow guitar for jazz gigs all the time now. A semi-hollow with a mahogany body and neck and a maple top would be perfect.
  17. zguitar71

    '00 Super Eagle

    From the album: zguitar71 - Guitars and amp and pedals

    © © Heritage Owners Club (2007-2009)

  18. From the album: zguitar71 - Guitars and amp and pedals

    © © Heritage Owners Club (2007-2009)

  19. From the album: zguitar71 - Guitars and amp and pedals

    © © Heritage Owners Club (2007-2009)

  20. Which model Heritage are you interested in? That does suck about the Gibsons. I sold an early PRS about 15 years ago and wish I had not. In 1988 I could have bought a `59 Black triple pickup Les Paul for $1000 that I had in my pocket and turned it down, 20 years later they jump to $75,000 in value and I could just die. In `88 people only wanted the Burst Les Paul's from the late 50's and they were selling for 25K then, people bought the triple models for the PAF pickups and put them other guitars. Live and learn.
  21. The v2 was a purchase back in `89 when I was 19. I wanted a v guitar but could not afford one. I walked into my local guitar shop (Amro Music in Memphis TN at the time) and they had the V2 out with a tag that showed the invoice with the price they paid for it and next to that a price tag with the same number on it. It sold to me for $450, they had it in the back of the shop since 1980 and go sick of looking at it collect dust. The V2 was very pricey at the time, something like $1450 around $4300 today. The guitar really is not very good. The thing is very awkward and the pick-ups sound like poop. There have been article written about them in the past and some people think they could be the next `58 V but I'll believe it when I see it. If it does go sky high in value it will be for sale and I will look forward to an early retirement. I still have the Warranty card that the store filled out but my lazy ass never finished and never sent in along with the bill of sale and some other crap that came with it trying to sell me some Gibson brand shit. The Strat is a Warmoth DIY with SD 5-2 pickups and sounds great.
  22. Here are some pictures of my stuff. All 6 The back of the SE The well worn ES347 Some neck wear to go with some case wear.
  23. I joined a few days ago. I have owned a Heritage Super Eagle for 11 years. I hope the picture I am posting works but I have a tendency for failing at the computer stuff. I own 6 guitars and one Carr Slant 6v 2x12amp. My most played guitar is my 1981 Gibson es347, I bought it in `91 and it was in mint condition, now it is full of scratches, nicks and the finish is about 50% worn off the neck. Before Smoking was banned in our bars here in Missoula, I would open the case it smelled like an ashtray. The smell and playing wear make this guitar very dear to my heart. I also own a Santa Cruz D/PW, a Gibson V2, a Warmoth Strat and the other very dear to my heart guitar, a 1938 Kalamazoo KG-31. It is loud, full of tone, light weight, big necked (no truss rod) and I only paid $300 for it, what more could a person want? I play my Heritage mostly at home or at jazz gigs when I am in the mood but the size usually keeps it at the house and the 347 comes out instead. I love the guitar and HAD to have it, I have always been a big Kenny Burrell fan. I bought it new from Wolfe Guitars in January 2000. It has Seth Lover pickups, upgraded wood (something called the Ultra upgrade), gold hard wear, Imperial tuners and an antique natural finish. The tone is big and it breaks up the Carr 6v perfectly when set on 18 watts. Christopher Gray
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