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  1. Yesterday I attended the Dallas international guitar show. This was my first guitar show, so I wasn’t exactly sure what to expect other than guitars everywhere. I got to meet some great manufacturers and try out a few boutique brands that I had never heard of before who are doing great things, such as Warrior guitars. I also had the pleasure of meeting Mike Ortiz and Peter Farmer while visiting the heritage booth. Great guys. I first was chatting with Mike for a bit and I expressed my zeal for the brand. After a bit, I share with him a picture of my favorite heritage, my H-155. He excitedly yelled for Pete to come over and check it out. When Pete came by I showed it and immediately he smiled and said he remembered building that guitar. Pete told me that he doesn’t know if I realized (I didn’t), but my guitar was built comepletely end to end by himself. Pete spoke about the detail of how my washed blue is different than the washed blue that they now use (which I’ve noticed) and described why it was different (on my guitar he hand sanded the paint to achieve the look). He said that the workers thought it was too difficult and time consuming to go that route for the production. Pete remembered the details such as putting the binding in the single f-hole. I could feel his pride and satisfaction as he spoke out my guitar. What an awesome experience for me! I walked away knowing that my cherished axe was forged by a master, which I already knew by how it played, but now I know that master’s name is Pete Farmer.
    7 points
  2. I have before on here. But here it is again for the sake of the story
    7 points
  3. I detest the absolute absurdity of YouTube videos like this. There are a couple of YT formulas to get a lot of hits on guitar vids, the first being, "...I can make this cheap used squier just as good as the custom shop all those rich guys paid too much for!" The other is "you can't hear it/yes I can hear it!" First of all, Gibson has churned out a LOT of things with the "Les Paul" model name on it. Thing is, they ALL SOUND DIFFERENT even though they all say, "Gibson Les Paul". It depends, what wood, what construction method, what hardware, what pickups and even what strings are on it, what it is plugged into and most of all, who's playing it. My 1998 H150 came with SD 59's, and Nashville Tune-o-Matic and a zing stop bar. It weighs a bit over 9lbs. It also came with 70's era Les Paul potentiometer in it, namely, 300K/100k volumes and tones. So, it sounded pretty dark most of the time I've owned it. I had occasion to replace a pot, was surprised to find the values and put in the more commonly used "vintage" era 500k pots. Incredible difference in tone, much brighter, fuller and a touch more output. I have a 60th Anniversary Gibson Les Paul 1960-Reissue, V2. It's 1 piece mahogany, no weight relief, 8lbs, 1oz in weight. It has the correct "'burst" era ABR-1 screwed into the wood and the light aluminum stop bar. It has the Custombucker III pickups, unpotted, alnico-III very PAF type in it, and the 50's era wiring. It does that, "beefy telecaster" Les Paul thing, in spades. Plus, at 8lbs, it is a joy on my aging back. These two sound incredibly different from each other, despite being so extremely similar in so many ways. But my Gibson Les Paul sounds incredibly different than a Norlin era Les Paul with the pancake body and a maple neck, and different than an 11lb example from the 1980's with Tim Shaw's, or T-tops, or any of the overwound, ceramic magnet pickups they offered at the time. So, really, no one can hear the "brand", but you can discern between instruments that were built differently, of different materials and methods, even if the brand and model are the same. My just acquired 2001 H535 is super light and it gets that classic 335 tone. I had a 1997 ES335 "dot reissue" that sounded like poo, no matter what you did with it.
    5 points
  4. My 150 Artisian Aged Custom Core has been a labor of love in modifying it to how I wanted it to look and sound. Like the theory behind the 150 CC, I used a '59 LP Burst as my inspiration. -Some of the mods were merely just personal choice; 1) I greatly prefer A2 magnets over A3 magnets so I installed a used set of Throbak SLE 101s pickups with aged covers. 2) I like the look of the Rhythm/Treble "poker chip" pickup selector 3) I replaced the orange drop caps with the same values in repro Bumble Bee paper & oil caps 4) For consistency in pot values and taper I installed RS Guitarworks 500K volume and tone pots -Some of the mods were just necessary functionally; 1) the bridge studs and the stoptail studs were drilled at an angle instead of straight into the top from the factory so the TOM bridge & stoptail wouldn't lower completely. So a Faber locking ABR bridge and Faber locking StopTail studs were used to fix the original off angle bridge & stoptail studs. 2) three of the aged tuners stripped and became useless. I replaced them with CHROME (I couldn't find Nickel ones which I would have preferred) Gotoh tuners that were a direct drop in, lighter, and had improved tuning ratio. .... BUT WAIT, A MAJOR UPDATE ON NEW AGED NICKEL FINISHED GOTOH TUNERS.... SO... the last 150 CC mod/improvement was buying on Ebay some new Antique Nickel Finish Gotoh tuners. To me, the Chrome on the Gotohs tuners was a complete eyesore with the aged finish of the rest of the 150 CC. These new Antique Nickel Finish Gotoh tuners were not cheap ($110 + shipping) but to me they were the final piece in the puzzle to getting my Aged 150 CC to look close to Vintage LP Burst. (I also added some Kluson-like tuner buttons to finish the transformation) BEFORE with the CHROME GOTOH tuners AFTER with the new ANTIQUE NICKEL GOTOH 510 tuners
    4 points
  5. I supplied the finger board on that and a few others.
    4 points
  6. Well said, Kuz. My take on the whole thread is this: Who cares? So an H150 might sound different from a Gibson LP. So what? That doesn't make it a bad or undesirable guitar. The entire 'holy grail' thing about LP tone is utter nonsense. Why should that be the standard by which everything else is judged? I think people should look at how much they enjoy an instrument's playability first--if you don't enjoy playing it, you're not likely to play it--, and maybe its sound later. Sound can be altered in so many ways from pickups to pedals to amps to amp settings, and I think it's pointless to chase after some mythical sound they think they hear from something manufactured 65 years ago.
    4 points
  7. Look, this is a very subjective and controversial subject on what impacts the tone of a guitar the most. I will default to Terry Mcinturff (master luthier and has made guitars for all major artists). Check him out on YouTube. His main concept is that pickups are only microphones that amplify the acoustic sound of an electric guitar's chassis. He states how Barbara Streisand's voice will definitely will change (mostly tonally) when she sings through different vintage microphones, but her basic vocal characteristics (her vibrato, her vocal range, her loudness and punch, ect) are still the same. His point; the wood dictates the essentials of an electric guitar's tone & sustain. Different pickups will change the overall tone/timbre, but it won't enhance the sustain, or the openness, or fix muddy or thin guitars. Pickups can only magnify what the acoustic tone coming from the body's chassis is producing. I have owned two McInturff's (still own one Carolina Custom) and it is truly the best single cut/LP style guitar, I have ever played. Bottom line, when shopping for an electric guitar spend most of your time playing it acoustically listening for the overall tone, sustain, and check for dead spots (sustain and dead spots can't be fixed by different pickups).
    4 points
  8. Here are some shots of my band and me playing a gig last night. A friend of mine is a professional photographer who has photographed many jazz legends up close in performance at the Monterey Jazz Festival and (and many other venues) for decades . https://michaeloletta.com/. He’s a real pro and can make even an amateur like me look like a real musician. I had no idea he was photographing. Consummate professional. The guitar is way more photogenic than me…
    4 points
  9. Congrats on the new guitar. Here's my H170 (I believe it's a 1990
    4 points
  10. Wow! Beautiful! I think they called the H-155's with that florentine cutaway the "Pro" model? Very cool you got to meet it's maker, too. Pete is the man!
    3 points
  11. Honestly, what pickup winder offers a low-moderate output conventional humbucker that isn't claimed to be a "PAF clone". 🤔 Schaller made an enormous number of pickups, and an enormous *variety* of pickups. There's not just one Schaller humbucker sound, there are a huge number of Schaller pickup variants, all made to order for different guitar manufacturers. Here's one of my favorites, a 1984 Fender Esprit Elite, part of the "Fender Master Series", the Esprit, Flame and D'Aquisto. Robben Ford played the Esprit, and Fender eventually re-launched it as the Robben Ford signature series. It's a really nice guitar, made in Japan and supervised by D'Aquisto. These were the first with Fender's "TBX" tone control system and intended as very high-end instruments. The pickups are Schaller, used on all three models. They are definitely on the mellow side, and have a unique mounting system with 3-point alignment, and the top of the pickup has a radius to match the strings. Of course, all the rest of the hardware probably looks familiar, tuners, bridge and fine-tune tailpiece are all Schaller. All of this still works great 40-years later. This unusual pickup system appears in Schaller's OEM literature in the mid-1970's. I'm not aware of another guitar maker who used it. They were not cheap, and quite innovative. I don't know what deal Heritage did with Schaller, or what they ordered or what spec's they asked for from Schaller. But they could have ordered whatever they wanted from them.
    3 points
  12. New (used) guitar day for me. Picked up a nice clean, 2001 H535 in natural, figured maple with HRW pickups. Very little wear on it front or back, frets in very good condition. I had an aluminum stop bar and Nashville tune-o-matic bridge, so I swapped off the Schaller bridge and tailpiece. The Schaller hardware is ok, but the rollers on that style tailpiece tend to work themselves loose over the years, and I had the parts in my parts drawer. At 7lbs, 12-ounces, it is a really nice light weight. The label doesn't say "HRW", but the black-dot on the switch and the dates match, no sign that it has ever been worked on before, so it looks all legit as shipped back then. I know HRW's are not everyone's cup of tea, but I'll give them a fair shot. So far, it sounds really good with them. Sadly, the Heritage case didn't come with it. It looks like they're out of stock at Heritage, maybe I'll call Monday and see about it. It did come with a cheap, poorly fitting generic case. It does fit pretty well in a Gibson ES335 case. But there's some disagreement as to the ES335 vs. H535 dimensions, and I don't know if the Heritage case is specifically-fitted or not. It does appear the 535 might be a little thinner than the 335. The 2002 H535 joins my 1998 H150 that I've had for over 20 years as my second Heritage. The H150 came factory with SD59's, Nashville bridge and heavy stop bar. It's been a great guitar all this time too. Photo of the H535 after cleanup, swapping the hardware and restringing. Temporarily occupying a Gibson case.
    3 points
  13. All of the above comments in this thread discussing how the many varieties of H150's, LP's, etc. sound different are very interesting and enlightening. For some odd reason however, I sound pretty much the same on all of my solid body guitars.
    3 points
  14. Schaller did all kinds of stuff right. Lots and lots and lots of very well made Schaller guitar parts out there. The "Nashville Tune-o-Matic" bridge - Schaller. Look how many say, "made in Germany". Schaller right there. They made a lot of very good tuning machines used on a variety of brands. The Schaller GTM bridge, aka "roller bridge" works fine, just looks weird. The top-loader tailpiece is weird looking, but very functional, especially with fine-tuners, if you want fine tuners. Schaller humbuckers were well regarded in their day and widely used by the entire guitar industry. I've taken electrical measurements of them as well as taken them apart and honestly, they're well made and nothing bad about them. Guitar pickups are about 98.9% mythology and 1.1% actual engineering. There's only so many ways to wind two bobbins full of wire and stick a bar magnet between them. You might like something else, because it is different, but that doesn't mean the other is "bad". I also can't fault Schaller on the spare parts support and ease of ordering. I've certainly replaced many worn or butchered saddles and other miscellaneous stuff over the years and you can still order them right from Schaller in Germany. You can even ask them questions about stuff they stopped making 30 years ago and if they have the data, they'll actually try to answer your technical questions.
    3 points
  15. 1) I like the feel and generally the look of the "aging" on CCs. But the headstock aging is a little too much for sure. 2) The tuners do suck. I replaced them with drop in Gotohs and it is a HUGE improvement. 3) The pickups sound OK, but I like A2s so I dropped in a used set of Throbak SLE-101s. I called Heritage to see if they would sell me a set of unpotted Parson Street pickups, but they said no because they were all currently potted.
    3 points
  16. https://imgur.com/a/hd8Qf4K
    2 points
  17. I've owned the Mesa Fillmore 50 combo for about a year and I can say the first position on the gain switch gives up the glassy tones with ease, the second position gives up the tweedy tones, and the third position is classic Boogie. Randall Smith has said he based the tone stack on the vintage tweeds, but with the mid control down low, and the gain switch at the 1st position you can easily get the classic Fender clean tones. Another thing these amps are louder the most people give them credit for.The problem is the most people are running the preamp gains too low. When they preamp gains are above the halfway mark which is still very clean on position one, and the master is cranked they are very loud. The volume on the master doesn't really come on 'till the last third, it's way different than most amps which develop most of their volume in the first two thirds of their travel. I have no problem getting clean above some hard hitting drummers.
    2 points
  18. I've owned so many amps I can't count them all, and I still own quite a few, and... I like my Mesa Fillmore 50 more than any amp that I've ever owned. My favorite amps are tweed amps and the middle gain position on the Fillmore shines for that. The low gain positions are also very useful, and the reverb is huge. You're gonna love your new amp!
    2 points
  19. I was told directly from Mike Ortiz that the letter prefixes stopped in 2020 for the 150s and in 2023 for the 535s.
    2 points
  20. Fidelity with the Harvest mutual funds option plan
    2 points
  21. I owned one of the first single cut Pro's in Orange Translucent. Here is my DC Pro.
    2 points
  22. Regarding the weight of Les Paul Customs...
    2 points
  23. From Terry McInturff: "To over-simplify a very deep and misunderstood topic...the reason as to why the innate ( non/electronic) resonant characteristics of the electric guitar are of pivotal importance is this: the characteristics of the unplugged guitar dictate how the strings can/cannot vibrate, and hence how the strings can/cannot interact with the pickup(s). In this way it can be shown that the unplugged resonant "signature" of an electric guitar places true boundaries upon what can/cannot be amplified, no matter what the pickups or other electronics may be. If a certain spectrum of the overtone series is weak or absent, no pickup can "invent" what is missing. The "unplugged personality" of the guitar is therefor of foundational importance. This TCM Marquee semi-hollow body is ready for top carving and then, binding. It is an extremely lightweight body, and will be very reactive to string vibrations in a pre-determined way. It's easy to build an acoustically loud and vibrant guitar that misses the desired tonal target. With a design like this, the resonant character of the neck is especially important...make-or-break important. I can finesse the final available overtone series from here via the neck (within the boundaries of the design and the actual body's character). It's not possible to do with just any example of the neck woods...in this case, H. Mahogany. I cannot grab just any example of that wood and expect to "hit the target". It is...to quote Al Gore..."an inconvenient truth".
    2 points
  24. Your guitar is beautiful. I had the pleasure of talking to Pete after a tour of the factory years ago. He is a true gentleman and an asset for Heritage guitars.
    2 points
  25. Yeah, that's the best part of the Schaller STM bridge, the string spacing is very adjustable. They're not all that heavy either. The STM bridge weighs 58 grams, the top-loader tailpiece weighs 126 grams. Yeah, I started playing as a kid around 79. That's the era of brass-everything, including "Fat Heads" , brass plates to put on the back of headstocks, "for sustain!" The STM bridges have a common, but easily fixed problem. Over the years, the threaded shaft of the rollers works loose from the forks that hold it to the intonation screws. If you can pinch the roller bead and pull it out of the bridge, they're loose and that, is the "tone sucking" problem. The easy fix is a tiny dot of red Loctite in the little forks that hold the threaded shafts. Requires careful work under a magnifying glass and just a tiny dot of loctite on the end of a toothpick is plenty. You don't want it on the threads or anywhere else. Then just press them back in carefully centered, and let the Loctite cure. Some Loctite activator will help, since chrome is inactive metal. Don't bend the forks to tighten them. They were peened originally, but the metal is cast zinc and will crack easily. Once the Loctite cures, they're good as new and sound good again.
    2 points
  26. 1) Just personal preference, but I would not put a Nashville bridge (locking or not) on a guitar when I could put an ABR bridge (my preference is a locking Faber ABR bridge). I prefer the ABR for ascetics and the functionally so I can lower the stoptail closer to the body. (Although, my favorite guitarist Larry Carlton I guess prefers a Nashville bridge..) 2) I do think the "locking" feature of both the Faber locking bridge and Faber locking stoptail does slightly increase sustain (due to the fact everything is locked down tight and no vibration from the body is lost on loose parts). Also, once the bridge and stoptail are locked down, you can remove the strings without having to worry about the bridge or stoptail moving or falling off the guitar. (Even my Gibson and Collings guitars that came from the factory with ABR-1 bridges, I have switched them out for the locking Faber ABR bridge and locking stoptail studs) 3) The Custom Core comes from the factory with an aluminum stoptail. If you have a heavy zinc or steel stoptail, I would highly recommend upgrading to an aluminum stoptail. The aluminum gives a clearer and more open sound. 3) Yes, Daniel (Rockabilly69) was responsibly for turning me on to exclusively using Faber locking ABR bridges and locking stoptail studs on all my tuneamatic/stoptail equiped guitars. 4) Daniel, I did all the work on your 535 P90. No drilling was needed from the the Nashville conversion to Faber. The Faber bridge post system comes with an easy way to remove the pot metal bridge plugs and you tap in the Faber steel bridge posts.
    2 points
  27. I have compared my H150 directly with new and older LPs. It didnt really sound like any of them, and to be honest even the LPs didnt sound the same as each other. My H150 also didnt sound like any of the H150s I compared it to although a lemon burst had a similar vibe about it, same tight clear bottom end. Even with different pickups it still didnt sound like anything Ive compared it to. My stock 1978 Ibanez CN100 or 200(?)( I cant remember) sounded more like some of the R8,9s than my H150. The Ibanez had a bolt on neck :0 . If the H150 sounded like any of the LPs I looked at, I doubt I wouldve bought it. I wouldve kept looking for the sound I was looking for in a LP style guitar. Its not that my H150 doesnt have a LP style guitar sound, most LP style guitars do, it just has a "thunk", a tight, deep, clear bottom end and a clarity right through the mids to the top without getting harsh and fizzy but still giving the right amount of "chank" and "ching". Most LP style guitars Ive tried, H150s included, had a "chalkiness " through the whole range of frequencies that annoys me. I think most people actually look for and desire that chalky sound, so I could be describing it wrong. Thunk, chank, ching and chalkiness... I know what I mean.
    2 points
  28. Are you saying you're going to put a Nashville Faber on your guitar??? I have never heard a guitar go from an ABR bridge to a Nashville and sound better. And as I've said in many earlier posts, I've worked on 100's of guitars. I love Faber bridges, and as Kuz will tell you, I hipped him to them. I especially like the brass saddle tone lock bridges. I have them on both of my H150s, my H525 P90 (that Kuz sold me), and my Firebird. Every single time they cleaned up the low end and gave me a more balanced tone. On every one of these guitars they replaced a Nashville! Another benefit of the ABR is that could always get the tailpiece into it's sweet spot (low to the body) without having the string hit the back of the bridge. And besides the guitars that I still own. I replaced the Nashvilles on two other Les Paul Specials, an SG Classic, and a Firebird. And all of those sounded better with the Faber ABR. I only ever had one bad experience with Faber with an ABR that sounded dead. But a few weeks after I installed it I got a letter from Larry Corsa and he told me mine came from a bad batch and that he would send me a new one. I never told him about my bad bridge!!! And the new one was great. Now that's customer service! If you want a great set of pickups with the jazz/jb vibe, pair a Wolftone Legend in the neck with a Wolfetone Fenris in the bridge. Same vibe better tone. If your guitar is dark try a 0.15uf cap in the neck, and a .022uf in the bridge. If it's bright, try .022uf caps for both the neck and bridge! 500K pots all the way round! That's the setup in this guitar and it rules, I love having the ballsy bridge pickup...
    2 points
  29. I have read so many arguments about wood making a difference, the discussions seem to fall apart into chaos and anger. I’m not sure how anyone could argue with Terry Mcinturff though. I also firmly feel wood plays a huge role in the sound of the guitar and feel of the guitar. It is why I love my 150 so much, it is a joy to play plugged in or not. It is a joy to thump the neck with my finger and hear what it sounds like. When the guitar sounds great unplugged or just tapped on with a finger it will definitely sound great with good hardware, electronics and a great amp. They all come together for a killer sound. I play all my guitars unplugged the majority of the time. When I plug them in they all translate the unplugged sound and feel into the amp. I don’t use pedals and all my amps are fender derived so not super high gain and I think that really allows the guitar to express itself. Each one has its own character but they are all LP derived.
    2 points
  30. TO ME, the best repro PAF ever made and by far the most consistent from set to set. All my humbucker guitars have them and they are perfect for me. I have tried Lollars, Wolftones, Seth Lovers, Gibson Custombuckers, Peter Florence Voodoo Specials, and MANY more... none (TO ME) were close to Throbaks. Luckily, I bought most of my Throbaks years ago when they were more affordable!
    2 points
  31. Hey it's friday. A better shot of that trans black H150. Mic stand? Abuse on the front I might try & get refinned. Hey people pay extra for fake abuse & aging: does the real thing look as good? Lol
    2 points
  32. The aluminum Pinnacle bridge and stoptail on the 150 Custom Core is definitely a step in the right direction, but I wish (for at least the CC models) they would have used a locking Faber ABR or an original ABR-1 bridge. The biggest problem with the Pinnacle bridge is it uses proprietary bridge studs (screwed directly into the top) that are larger in diameter than the original ABR-1. The Faber locking ABR bridge will still work if you use the Pinnacle bridge studs, the Pinnacle thumb wheels, and the Pinnacle locking top screws. I am not sure if a traditional (non-locking) ABR-1 will fit with the large Pinnacle studs. Original hardware... Locking Faber bridge (using Pinnacle bridge studs, thumb wheels, and top locking caps. Locking Faber stoptail studs using the Pinnacle aluminum bridge. Stoptail is flat to the body.
    2 points
  33. I had a '99 H-150 that must have been between 11 to 12 pounds. It sustained for days. I liken it to a piano. Great tone! I sold it because it was so heavy -even in my late twenties. I have only heard one guitar like that and it was a friend's father's '59. Yeah, nice suite... I found several suits in the dumpster out side of my apartment. I brought the jackets in to give to a young kid living near me. A buddy said to put on the jacket and glasses and do a Stephen Stills thing and he took a photo. The kid loved the jackets. I didn't tell him they probably belonged to a dead man.
    2 points
  34. Awe, but they do.... I ordered some 510s off ebay with a new "Antique Nickel" finish. I will report back when they come in, installed, and post pictures.
    2 points
  35. 20 years ore more ago people would buy digital cameras and test them and the lenses by taking pics of newspapers tape to their walls and go on about the good and bad. They never used their cameras to get decent photos. They would buy and sell and buy and sell -never satisfied. Was it the gear or was it the photographer? These discussions always take me back to that.
    2 points
  36. I got on the phone with Heritage and bought a b-stock, or "shop-worn" case at a nice discount. LOL, yeah, the guitar world makes no sense at all. So much is voodoo and superstition and the often silly, "conventional wisdom" from the interwebs. I'm an electrical engineer by training. I have the equipment to measure pickups magnetically and electronically. I can measure the coil inductance, capacitance, resonant frequency and I can take response plots using a signal generator, exciter coil and an integrator with an oscilloscope and make accurate frequency response Bode plots. If it weren't such a PITA to get to the wiring in a 335/535, I'd have measured these already. There's a little "white corrosion" I want to clean off the bodies of the pots, and I'm curious enough, that I'll get around to measuring these. The extra long solder joint on the covers of the HRW are a sign someone didn't want us in there easily. I've never seen images of one opened up. I have a pile of Schaller humbuckers in my work bench draw and I've measured them. It will be interesting to have an objective measure of these. Honestly, the difference in tone by setting the pickup-string distance was rather marked with the HRW, more than I think most humbuckers I've played with. I started at 1/16" from the string to the covers and worked them down, little by little. At a certain point, with just a little more distance, the zingy-ness dropped away and they got right into the zone. They have relatively strong magnetic fields, likely alnico-V magnets, as most similar Schallers and SD59's also have. The Custombucker III's in my Gibson have about half the magnetic strength at the poles, as they are alnico-III and they're happy to be very close to the strings.
    2 points
  37. My Heritages all have Grovers. I don't think I ever got any with Schaller tuners. I tried putting Ivory keystones on my Grovers once, they lasted a few weeks and were off. I think they look really classy, but they strip out too easily.
    2 points
  38. I have NI Groove Agent, XLN Addictive Drums 2, a handful of other "drum machine" VSTs (because they're like Pokemon, you have to catch them all, right?), the built-in stuff that comes in Ableton Live and Cubase Pro, and a Roland TR-8. For "quality" sounds, Groove Agent of Addictive Drums win. For "just lay down a foundation to jam along with", the TR-8 wins hands down. Several years ago, though, Roland superseded the TR-8 with the TR-8s, which has some different functionality. Never bothered to "upgrade" because what I have works for what I want to do with it. If I'm building a track, the work flow, generally, is to just get that four on the floor going with the TR-8 and then eventually replace it with better sounding/more complex MIDI patterns from Groove Agent. Just depends on how much effort I feel like making at the time and whether I'm truly "building a track" or simply "futzing around", aka "noodling."
    2 points
  39. Thanks everyone! I've been around at least one or more Heritage Forums over the last 20 years. I got my H150 back in 2002, when it was a used guitar (very used at that point!) from Buffalo Brothers at the Marin Guitar Show. The H535 is my latest acquisition. I was out looking for a fretless bass of all things, spotted this hanging in a corner and gave it a tryout. Kind of like "just looking" at puppies at the pound. When I first looked it over, was amazed at the condition, despite the used-guitar-shop, "grunge" all over it. They had misdated it as a 2020, but the R-serial number clearly dated it, along with the Schaller bridge and two-screw pickups. The black dot switch tip I also spotted as the HRW, and sure enough, there they are. Handwritten date corresponds with the serial number. I'll keep the Schaller bridge and tail aside, as there's nothing wrong with them and cosmetically, they're also in good shape. As I recall from the era, HRW were a factory upcharge and I think the wood was likely a factory upgrade as well. The top, back and sides are very "flamey". Virtually no fretwear, binding nibs all intact. Clean inside and out, very little dust inside. After a little setup work, I managed to find a sweet spot for the pickup height adjustments, where it really gets that semi-hollow sound happening. The HRW's are pretty hot but remarkably clear sounding. Tone control is also very effective, and a little tone rolloff sweetens them up without darkening them. The Nashville bridge and aluminum stop bar made it a little brighter than the Schaller hardware, both acoustically and in the amp. Bummer about the case. This one clearly lived most of its life in the case, but who knows where it went. Would have loved to have it. Looks like TKL cases are still Heritage's manufacturer. It fits very well in a modern, "brown vintage Gibson" case for a 335. Though it just seems weird to put a Heritage in a Gibson case, and I need to sell the guitar (an ES-135) that lives in that case now. If I get a chance, I'll measure the inductance, capacitance, resonant frequency and make a Bode plot of the pickups. I've been studying Schaller pickups from the 80's-2000's for another project. It will be interesting to see how they compare electronically.
    2 points
  40. I had an H170, once upon a time. Had a ToneSucker(tm) and everything. Never should have moved it on. Enjoy your new guitar!
    2 points
  41. Yes sir. 2017. It was pretty special for me. Pete is so freaking down to earth and knowledgeable. I’m not sure how it was advertised, but the label doesn’t say pro. I do know that the wood, paint, and pups ( lollar low wind imperial) were hand picked by Eddies guitar. Pete said he personally did all the 155s with the florentine cutaway and the bound single f-holes.
    1 point
  42. Flame On. Let us see them!
    1 point
  43. My favorite finish! so nice.
    1 point
  44. Are you sure these weren't Sperzel tuners? I've had this exact problem with Sperzel tuners, which Wolfe ordered on his guitars for a while, but never with Schallers.
    1 point
  45. Ask a car detailer about ozone treatment. They usually offer it as a service to get smells out of cars. Wipe the guitar down with pure naphtha first several times with clean cloth and clean naphtha each time. Then ozone it. Ammonia based cleaners like Glass Plus really cut through tobacco goo, but aren’t safe for many guitar finishes. But ok on plastics and plated metals. A semi-hollow will be hard to clean the inside, hence ozone treatment is the best option. The case will be more difficult to deodorize. All the soft materials absorb odors. Fairly easy to replace though.
    1 point
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