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Case humidification for 530/535?


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Your guitar will "age" faster with humidity swings.  The fretboard binding will show cracks.  The finish will check sooner.  The truss rod will require adjustment.

If you had a 1950 D'Angelico or a 1600s Stadivarius it would be important.

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I run a humidifier in the room rather than try to keep a dozen guitars individually humidified.   The only exception is that I have a Martin wick in my Taylor acoustic.  

The humidifier drinks about 3 gallons of water per day in the winter.

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10 hours ago, TalismanRich said:

I run a humidifier in the room rather than try to keep a dozen guitars individually humidified.   The only exception is that I have a Martin wick in my Taylor acoustic.  

The humidifier drinks about 3 gallons of water per day in the winter.

I do the same, but I don't go through that much water.  Maybe a gallon a day in the dead of winter.  But I have a small room.

A humidifier is worth the trouble and allows more consistency.

I bought a Heritage Johnny Smith in winter from a Canadian guitar store.  There was some nitro flaking at the neck joint, which they disclosed.  Their humidity was 18% with their humidifier running.

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I keep my room humidified to 40%, and an in case sponge humidifier in the acoustic guitar case. 

Edited by chico
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I've had my 535 hanging on a basement wall (Insulated and paneled) for 4 years now.  Have only need to tweak a truss rod once.  Its never in its case unless I'm transporting it.  I wouldn't worry about it so much since there is no pressure on the top like an acoustic since it has a center block.

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1 hour ago, DetroitBlues said:

I've had my 535 hanging on a basement wall (Insulated and paneled) for 4 years now.  Have only need to tweak a truss rod once.  Its never in its case unless I'm transporting it.  I wouldn't worry about it so much since there is no pressure on the top like an acoustic since it has a center block.

I'm more concerned about my 530 than my 535.

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I was once told that it is not a good idea to humidify laminate tops as it can cause the glue to come unglued. I have a 62 Casino that has never been humidified(and I live in Montana....) and is solid as a rock. I think your 530 should be ok. I do humidify my acoustics however. i have seen amazing things around acoustics where theu are all out of whack and then with a case humidifier and a noodle, within a week, all is well.

I Austin we used to de-humidify. In Montana we do the opposite.

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Here are pics of a mid 1970s laminate Gibbons archtop that was gigged a lot in Pennsylvania. Temperature and humidity swings were unavoidable. The guitar survived well and is a gem. Some exposure effects are visible though. It's been refretted and has a new pickguard but plays like new.

These pics show lacquer checking on the top with dirt and oxidation in the checks. It looks like the wood might be cracked, but it isn't. The bracing is unscathed. The neck is perfectly straight.

Here are the effects of necessary exposure in a working guitar over a more than 40 year period in a highly variable climate. The instrument held up very well. It should last another 40 or more.

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What kind of Gibbons arch top is that with the round whole?

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7 hours ago, rwinking said:

What kind of Gibbons arch top is that with the round whole?

Howard Roberts or old L4 would be my guess

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Howard Roberts Artist.  These were built with a L-4 body except the top.  It's a laminate.  The top has unique bracing for Howard Roberts' tone.  The pickup is mounted to the neck like a Johnny Smith and was designed by the famous Bill Lawrence, who worked for Gibbons at the time.  The circuit includes a pot to dial in a midrange cut.  The neck is 25.5" and has 22 frets and is multipiece maple.  The fretboard in ebony.

I get the thread is on humidification, but since his name came up you should at least know a little bit about this historic figure.  He was very prolific as a player and teacher.

Here's a sample of his playing.  

 

Here's him doing his studio work.  You can catch him playing during this Ann-Margret screen test.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2iBX_wGbkU

Here he is with the guitar in question.

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I recently sold a similar guitar call  a J160 EC Fusion. It had a Charlie Christian pickup as well as a piezo. And you could blend the two. To bring this back to the topic, it had a solid top and laminate back. I was told to be careful in humidifying it as too much could de-laminate it. The guitar sounded great in blended mode but it never sounded like a jazz guitar at all on the Charlie Christian mode.

Oh, on that ann margret screen test, hubba hubba va va va voom!

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Ann-Margret may not raise the humidity but definitely adds heat.  Her star shone bright enough that Howard was wearing sunglasses.  Imagine doing a full day session rehearsing with her a few feet away.

But I digress.

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