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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/20/2021 in all areas

  1. I had a PRS 408 that I played for several years. It was always easy and fun to play, a great guitar, but it was never "just right". I couldn't bond with it. Then I played my Heritage H150 for the last 3 years. I had modified it with a vintage wiring harness and had it set up properly and I really enjoyed it. I was much happier with the H then I ever was with the PRS, but I was still wanting more. I got my H150 CC about 3 weeks ago, and it truly has that "special sauce". I don't know what it is, but I know it when I hear it. I speculate that it is the overtones that I'm hearing, but whatever, it just rings like a bell. This will be my #1 for the remainder of my career. (I'm 75, so there isn't a whole lot of career left, lol.)
    6 points
  2. I totally agree with this, its funny how many people poo poo the idea that wood contributes to the tone of an electric guitar, but as you know, I am a SERIAL MODDER and I have swapped necks around on many instruments, and many times that was the key to a great sounding guitar. I'm also am convinced that great fretwork, and precision cut saddles and nuts, get the strings ringing the way a pickup wants to hear them! Bottom line...you have to start with a great guitar before you turn on the electricity.
    3 points
  3. One good tip is to make a cardboard template to hold the pots, caps and ground line. Do your soldering on that, rather than inside the cavity of the guitar. Just line up the cardboard (a shoebox lid is fine), make circles that match up to the positions on the guitar, and punch them out. Mount the pots, and start soldering. It makes thing SO much easier.
    3 points
  4. After watching and reading numerous reviews I decided to purchase Xvive wireless guitar system. It arrived today along with a couple bags of candy from Sweetwater. The system works great. I plugged it in and started playing as I walked around the house to areas where I could not hear my guitar amp. My wife stayed in the music room and said the sound was as if I was plugged in and playing in front of the amp. I'm looking forward to trying it out the next time I play a gig.
    2 points
  5. An interesting alternative to the wet cloth or sponge I came across was to use a metal scouring pad which I put in a small glass ramekin (from a Gu pudding*). This has the advantage of cleaning the tip without cooling it. * If Gu puddings are not available in the USA you have my sympathy...
    2 points
  6. I never thought they were the awful pickups, which is what one would conclude if you read comments on forums. They are just different, as are the 200 other pickups on the market! They are strong in the bottom register, which probably is bad for high gain, since it will make everything boomy and muddy. For clean playing, if the bottom is too strong a simple tweak of the bass knob on the amp will usually takes care of it for me. That said, I do like the Seth Lovers, as they don't seem to emphasize any particular register. If it was a wine, people would say it was flat and boring!
    2 points
  7. Heritage love- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUFmwGT6R7k
    2 points
  8. 22 vs 20 frets, better fret access. 525s sound better when practicing unplugged. Both are excellent.
    2 points
  9. Excellent! They've really stepped up their customer service in the last couple of years. Glad it worked out for you.
    2 points
  10. I bet if you notified the factory of this oversight they'd make good on a label for you.
    2 points
  11. Au contraire, I pre- ordered mine from Sweetwater, then e-mailed Heritage and asked it they could fill the order for Sweetwater. Heritage folks were great to deal with and I had my guitar in about 3 weeks. I probably should add that I do spend a lot of money with Sweetwater so that could make a difference.
    1 point
  12. Mine is Egyptian Madi. It isn't accurate for squat.
    1 point
  13. For that kind of money, it should be ready to rock. I don't blame you one iota. I would do the same thing. Hands down.
    1 point
  14. I had just paid mine off. Then I saw that core demo….but it’s going back. Easy come, easy go.
    1 point
  15. Sweetwater’s my go to place for new gear. The customer service is second to none.
    1 point
  16. I bought a core 150 DEMO from Sweetwater Thursday. It came today. But the treble side bridge post is too high to engage the treble side bridge lock….so I’m sending it back. It would be an easy fix but I’m not taking a Dremel to a brand new custom core!!!! One wrong move and I own it!!! Lol. Beautiful guitar though…
    1 point
  17. If you ask, you will get a better deal at Sweetwater, but you have to ask. In addition, Sweetwater has an excellent setup routine that will get you whatever you want. I even had them install my brand of strings and they included the strings for free in the setup fee.
    1 point
  18. I would look at Sweetwater, or other online dealers. If they have the guitars in stock, you can pick the exact guitar you want from the options. And they have a great return policy. For the same price, I would look and find the top you want. Better to have a choice. If you aren't happy, return it. Just my opinion.
    1 point
  19. If they are selling at dealer prices, I don’t think it really matters
    1 point
  20. hahahahahaha I would have just bought a shiny new guitar
    1 point
  21. I think they're pretty good. Some will believe there are better, of course. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mURVofPTnY
    1 point
  22. Here's a product idea: Heritage could start selling their own brand of hot sauce, called "150 CC Special Sauce"
    1 point
  23. The set of Schallers that came with my H-575 sounded nice. I asked Jay Wolfe about swapping them out for HRW's at the time since I trusted the ear of my jazz guitar hero, Kenny Burrell. Kenny loved HRW's. Somehow Jay remembered how the Schallers sounded in that 575! He recommended I give them a chance before pulling them. Long story short, I pulled them and installed a set of HRW's. They sounded great...but just as Jay said, so did the Schallers. I'm convinced that most any decent pickup would sound great in THAT specific archtop. It even sounds amazing and woody acoustically! Conversely I once owned a Sweet 16 that did NOT sound great acoustically, and no matter how many pickups, tone pots, etc. I installed in that guitar, it NEVER sounded good to me. After a few years I sold it and never looked back. Other Sweet 16 owners swear by the wonderful tone of their instruments. Maybe I got a dud...maybe not. Pickups made NO difference in that guitar. Bottom line...Pickups should simply amplify the way a guitar sounds. Even if the guitar is a solid body, I listen to how it sounds acoustically before making any changes. I learned something from those archtop experiments. Now I don't get as excited about pickups as I used to. Also, I do spend time listening to how a guitar sounds without an amp before considering swapping out its electronics. YMMV.
    1 point
  24. I've always thought the Schallers were nice in hollowbodies. I tend to prefer Seth's in solid and semi hollow. I really don't care for 59s in the bridge position of a 535 vs a Seth.
    1 point
  25. That brings up a good point. Pickups sound different in different guitars, within certain bounds. And opinions differ among those who hear the same sounds. When I got my first Heritage, quite a while ago, the internet was loaded with criticism about them. I hadn't noticed any deficiency really but wondered why Heritage used them. So I asked the original factory owners, several times actually over a year or so as we chatted. They thought they were fine but offered to install any set of pickups on a custom order. Jay Wolfe pushed the "classic" models with conventional TOMs and stop tailpieces plus SD pickups, his favorites being the 59s and Seths, one of each on the same guitar sometimes. Otherwise they continued with Schallers. Not all Millies had HRWs. I had several with SDs from the factory. If GC says the label says HRWs, they had HRWs at one time, maybe today. I don't know why someone would replace the white dot tip, but that happens.
    1 point
  26. This is very good advice. Also remember you can refresh the tip of your iron by wiping it on a wet piece of old cloth or sponge. Then add a little solder to the tip of the iron to get it ready for the next move. It will only help to draw out you plans. Remember you are building this the reverse of what the top looks like when you play it.
    1 point
  27. Just order some PIO's from Ebay or somewhere and wait a few days.
    1 point
  28. You will be fine. Just go slowly. Make sure the pots are hot before you apply solder. Tin the connections to the back of the pot. I prefer a 50's wiring scheme. There are many diagrams out there. Just Google 50s Les Paul wiring diagram. You will save quite a bit of money by doing it yourself. Don't be afraid to make mistakes. If you overheat a part and have to buy a new one, consider that tuition. Best of luck. Don't be afraid to ask us questions.
    1 point
  29. So I have made a decision. I am going to attempt the pickup install myself. I have some extra pots laying around. I have ordered a 6' chunk of vintage braided wire. I will practice up and test the results with a multimeter. I feel I am pretty mechanically inclined. I will buy a station and a set of third hands. This is something I feel I SHOULD be able to do. If that doesn't go well for some reason, I will turn to a pro. Bit I would rather be self-reliant.
    1 point
  30. I replaced all of the Schaller's on my Heritages, but those were all solid bodies like the 150, 140, Stat, etc. My 535 came with Seth's already and sounded fine. I think if my 576 had Schaller's I would have left them on as they sound great on a hollow body guitar. In this video they had a wonderful sheen that the Seth's did not. I still really dislike the Schaller's on a solid body as they seem to lack the grit or something that I need when playing R&B or R&R. However, they are flat out wonderful on a "jazz" guitar and I am thinking of going back to them on my 576 after hearing the video sounds. Since I took them out of all of the solids, I probably have some laying around! Lastly, that guy Rich is a really great player! damn! What a nice touch, and his voicings were wonderful! I am now a fan and have subscribed to his channel.
    1 point
  31. Dibs on your current 525 when you get your new one.
    1 point
  32. Schallers are very good pickups. It's just a matter of taste.
    1 point
  33. I have played both and owned both. Although I love them both I prefer playing the H-525 more. It just fits me better if that makes sense. I recently scored a H-525 and can't put it down. My other guitars are getting jealous. I'm in the queue at Heritage on a Custom Build H-525. Hopefully soon.
    1 point
  34. It comes down to which of these two fine guitars you like best. I bought the very first H-530 built by the factory. However, after scoring a H-525, it simply suited me better. Sold the 530 and ended up buying two 525's over the years. YMMV.
    1 point
  35. Bingo, zg! For the longest time, I avoided PRS because of...what...their "perfection." Same thing with my McInturff. To me, they're so well done, I always felt I was at a distance form the instrument as something I could dig into, something I felt compelled to embrace. Finally got a PRS DGT that I did really like. But still...there was that slightly chilly "distance" that kept me from really bonding with it. The PRS is a really great guitar! The PRS is also on consignment. The "bonding" with the Custom Core was almost instantaneous!
    1 point
  36. I love that Heritage is getting to the level of PRS. I’ve owned two of them in my life but I just cannot bond with them; however, they are so top notch in quality they were both hard let go. At $3500 a CC H150 is great considering the Gib and PRS custom shop or Artist are quite a bit more and I know the H150 is exactly what I can bond with.
    1 point
  37. This is exactly what I've been saying, since I got mine. Though not at all short on that indefinable quality of "funk," my Custom Core exhibits the same sort of consistent attention to detail in the build that approaches, say, PRS....
    1 point
  38. Well said. Edwin Wilson brought his brand of 'secret sauce' to Heritage.
    1 point
  39. When I was actively building Eurorack modules (COVID hobbies, eh?), I invested in a vacuum desoldering gun gizmo. Saved me a ton of time, and the aloe plant grew bigger. Desoldering a bunch of microscopic SMT crap is a PITA. Worked a charm on through hole, too.
    1 point
  40. I had a solder sucker that would operate off of an air tank. Man, was I spoiled. The tip assembly fit in the end of a 50 watt iron and it would suck the solder into a glass tube. It worked so much better than one of the Pace suckers. An Aloe plant near by is a nice thing to have too. 😉
    1 point
  41. Chris, This! The changes are, for the most part, small, but there are a lot of them, and they are identifiable...I think. Those changes are like a formula or a recipe, tweaked by a brilliant chemist or chef (Edwin, Pete?), both of whom rely on a deep, empirical working knowledge of chemistry. And then, somehow, that empiricism turns into voodoo in the result. And, to quote Brent,..."LOL."
    1 point
  42. Simply amazing group of fine guitars, Mark. I think I see my fingerprints on that antique natural quilt top 157.
    1 point
  43. This is a discussion so.... Some things that "MAY" contribute: thinner finish, direct transfer of bridge energy through the ABR bridge posts, instead of pot metal Nashville bridge inserts like the regular H150s, the light weight tailpiece, lighter more resonant wood, perhaps better fret dress and nut cutting on their premium line (that is speculation). When I changed the bridge post on both of my H150s to the Faber BSW kits (screw in), I heard improvements in both of them. I haven't touched them since. Also when I first got the H150s, they were both in need of fret dress, and I cut new nuts for both of them. They were both abysmal in those areas, and my second H150 I bought brand new.
    1 point
  44. WOW! That is a gorgeous Eagle Classic! Congratulations and welcome to the HOC. Be Bop deserves her own song... "
    1 point
  45. 1 point
  46. I’ve owned 3 Heritages, a ‘99, ‘01 and ‘11. I had to do fret work on all three to get them more playable. The ‘11 is an H150, the fret work was very poor IMO and I had to do quite a bit of filing to get them to where they should have been. It never bothered me though since the structural integrity of the guitars and the tone was excellent and the cost was absurdly low for what you get compared to other USA brands. I certainly would never say that the “vintage” Heritage guitars are better or worst than the newer ones though.
    1 point
  47. The difficulty i have with generalizations about production years is that most of the instruments every year were very good.
    1 point


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