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deytookerjaabs

Dear Heritage, own up to new Heritage and change your website's feature pictorials

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Seriously. 

 

You go to the Heritage Website where they use all these recycled beautiful artistic shots of salt of the earth seasoned workers slowly handling instruments in Ye Olde Parson's factory location as the sun shines through the windows illuminating the clouds of sawdust in the air. Aesthetically pleasing.

 

When, in reality, it's a bunch of green new hire kids busting their butts in a factory that looks like Office Depot (and, yes, we've all heard the same folks with their shtick of how much improved everything is, this ain't about that). 

 

Just own it, don't give curious folks with no clue of the current brand the impression their fiddles are being made by aged builders in the vintage confines. Regardless of anyone's opinion on new vs old Heritage: It's aesthetically disingenuous. There's no problem with keeping the history alive, just put that stuff on a "years past" or historical part of the site. 

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It's called marketing. Ever seen where your food comes from? Try getting to know a politician for how they are in real life as compared to how the LOOK on TV. People buy into concepts as much as they buy the product itself. Are you suggesting that the guitar industry shows everyone the sweaty locals in a decimated rain forest that hacked down a Mahogany tree with a dull axe in order to try and sell it to a big time guitar manufacturer for $75.00?

Wait for it...

You want the TRUTH? YOU CAN'T HANDLE THE TRUTH!  hahahaha

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Next you're going to tell me that Orville Gibson didn't really build those old vintage Gibson guitars,  Les Paul didn't really design the "Les Paul" and that Leo Fender didn't hand solder all those amps together by himself.

While they have moved the production to a much cleaner, safer area, with adequate lighting, ventilation and temperature/humidity control, they still have the same benches,  tools,   racks,  ferris wheel, and duplicarver that were in the side of the building.  The process is the same as before,  As for not being the same old grizzly woodworkers that worked at Gibson,  they have always had younger workers in the factory.   Unfortunately,  the original guys are susceptible to the same aging process as you are.    Let's see if you're still doing the same job at the same plant 60 years after you started working!

I just hope the original guys are around to enjoy their retirements for a good long time.   They deserve it!

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for cluing me in that it's Marketing, I had no idea. 

 

 

I go to the PRS website and see pics & videos of current operations, same goes for Fender, same goes for Suhr, same goes for Collings etc etc etc. Yeah, in instances companies like Gibson & Fender will have old vids/shots of back in the day associated with reissues but this is completely different. Heritage's whole site makes it look like they're still in 2010 and intentionally so. That's fine, having odes to back in the day but they should get hip and be up front about modern Heritage. 

 

They aren't in the business of selling big macs. 

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5 hours ago, TalismanRich said:

Next you're going to tell me that Orville Gibson didn't really build those old vintage Gibson guitars,  Les Paul didn't really design the "Les Paul" and that Leo Fender didn't hand solder all those amps together by himself.

While they have moved the production to a much cleaner, safer area, with adequate lighting, ventilation and temperature/humidity control, they still have the same benches,  tools,   racks,  ferris wheel, and duplicarver that were in the side of the building.  The process is the same as before,  As for not being the same old grizzly woodworkers that worked at Gibson,  they have always had younger workers in the factory.   Unfortunately,  the original guys are susceptible to the same aging process as you are.    Let's see if you're still doing the same job at the same plant 60 years after you started working!

I just hope the original guys are around to enjoy their retirements for a good long time.   They deserve it!

 

 

 

 

Hey Rich, thanks for setting him straight. He taking jaabs at Heritage. He has never been to a PSP nonetheless the Heritage factory, so how can he make an accurate assessment anyhow??

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6 hours ago, HANGAR18 said:

It's called marketing.  People buy into concepts as much as they buy the product itself.

 

6 hours ago, TalismanRich said:

While they have moved the production to a much cleaner, safer area, with adequate lighting, ventilation and temperature/humidity control, they still have the same benches,  tools,   racks,  ferris wheel, and duplicarver that were in the side of the building.  The process is the same as before,  As for not being the same old grizzly woodworkers that worked at Gibson,  they have always had younger workers in the factory.   Unfortunately,  the original guys are susceptible to the same aging process as you are.  

With all due respect, dey', yes, there is that notion of truth in advertising...but, as Danny said, this is marketing.  And you've stated yourself: "...yes, we've all heard the same folks with their shtick of how much improved everything is, this ain't about that (which I assume you mean the shop "looking like Office Depot," which, in fact, it doesn't)."  And no, it isn't about that, at all...obviously.   

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Oh, I know how brand enthusiasts react to stirring the pot and I expect sure fire push back after a good old feather rustlin', let's have some fun!

 

C'mon now, there's a huge difference between "having younger employees" and having what's almost your entire work flow being fellas who are pretty green/young. And, there's nothing wrong with that though you'd think it'd be a mix. Yet, the website doesn't give you that impression at all. 

And, no, the source of "marketing" in guitar companies has many crazy faces but I'd still like you to point to a company who doesn't feature modestly up to spec shots of their production facilities on their site. It's been years since the renovation began at old parsons. Heck, even freakin' Benedetto guitars has up to date pics/features of their modern facility and current staff. 

 

Don't give me no BS as if Heritage is some super secret Gubment facility in the hills no one has access to:

 

 

 

^^^ If the new place doesn't look like Office Depot, Office Depot doesn't look like this:

office-depot-on-the-inside.jpg

 

Welcome to your windowless world of the future! 

 

 

All I'm saying is many years after they've left the old confines behind and now a sizeable chunk of time after leaving many of the seemingly older employees behind (but what do I know, I haven't asked them their age personally, some folks go gray at 20 I suppose) 

 

 

Oh, and here's the irony, FINALLY after Heritage gets a beautiful looking website featuring wonderful photos/snippets of how constructing guitars in the old building the truth is that Heritage 2019 looks nothing like that. They should OWN IT. Put up new photos of how it is, little features on the new builders, etc.... I stand by my statement that the current website seems disingenuous. :P

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When has Heritage ever kept their web site up to date? hahahahaha

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10 minutes ago, HANGAR18 said:

When has Heritage ever kept their web site up to date? hahahahaha

 

You're right! Now that's keeping the tradition alive, lol. 

 

Though, I might be off on this, I think they finally updated that old thing a bit after all the changes? Still, if they don't touch the website for a decade they'll be the Heritage of olde! 

You see all this "reaching out" stuff they're up to by being in big magazines and getting with bigger retailers etc, dude..their first Album was cool and then they sold out. 

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9 minutes ago, HANGAR18 said:

When has Heritage ever kept their web site up to date? hahahahaha

This is very true and hilarious.  However, I agree with Deytookerjabs on the issue of a more honest (i.e. full disclosure) of the current, modern factory identity vs. misrepresentation showing the quaint (i.e. crappy) looking old insides. 

A more ethical marketing approach would show the old school workstations, etc., but use it as a nod to the "Heritage" of the building and original owners.  Then show the new, modern OSHA approved factory that is churning out wonderful, hand made guitars. 

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They bought a company with history, they would be fools to not capitalize on that. 

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Marv started in 1956, JP in 1957 and Jim 1957. So they were 18-19 years old. When Marv was carving necks on the 58,59 60 bursts he was early 20's They guys in the photo with Pete showing off Pressure's Super light look older than their teens. 

Don't write off the workers because they have less than 30 years under their belt. If they produced Richies super light and Sky 52's Sweet 16 no body should question their skills.  

 

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I was under the impression that Heritage planned to move production back to the old building after renovations are complete. I could be wrong about that though.

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1 hour ago, PunkKitty said:

I was under the impression that Heritage planned to move production back to the old building after renovations are complete. I could be wrong about that though.

That was the plan and I hope they stick to that but...........................................................things could change as we've seen.

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4 hours ago, PunkKitty said:

I was under the impression that Heritage planned to move production back to the old building after renovations are complete. I could be wrong about that though.

that will never happen

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1 hour ago, brentrocks said:

that will never happen

 

Yea, it would be really hard to do that with the Gibson Custom Shop making guitars in there. hahahaha

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6 hours ago, Spectrum13 said:

Marv started in 1956, JP in 1957 and Jim 1957. So they were 18-19 years old. When Marv was carving necks on the 58,59 60 bursts he was early 20's They guys in the photo with Pete showing off Pressure's Super light look older than their teens. 

Don't write off the workers because they have less than 30 years under their belt. If they produced Richies super light and Sky 52's Sweet 16 no body should question their skills.  

 

 

 

It's not "writing off the workers"...otherwise I'd be slamming the workmanship. It's just, besides the founders, they walked a whole case of vets out the door IIRC. Yet, the websites gives the impression it's the old family & cast in the old confines, when it's really Heritage Depot (can I coin this term?) in new confines with a whole new cast of young folks beyond Pete Farmer and a couple founders who hang around. ...am I mistaken? 

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I thought the skinny was that these were going to made in the old factory....

 

 

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As far as I know, only the prototype Harmony guitars have been made.   At PSP last year, several HOC members that attended the tour said no Harmony guitars were made yet.  The Gibson Custom Shop guy (his name is escaping me) was to only be in charge of getting the Harmony line up and running.

Yea, I guess things change....

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As with the previous owners , you'll find Heritage to be marketing the tradition of the old plant and the history of what has come out of that old plant.  Literally the Heritage of Kalamazoo.  And as they restore that historic old plant and create a museum onsite ( along with other plans ) , you're unlikely to see that look to the past change.  That would include the history of Gibson and of Heritage guitars.   Of course, they've really just begun to get the new version started.  There's still a good amount of time before much of what is to be will come to fruition .    

  I will say the person that I spoke to that was most happy with the new modern upgrades to their equipment was Jim Deurloo.  ( One of the founders of Heritage and Plant Manager back when Parsons Street was a Gibson plant )  Dust and temperature control, state of the art finishing equipment and new organizational systems  seemed to make him quite proud of the new Heritage.  The future of Heritage was very much in doubt before and now there are many changes yet to see at Parsons Street.   He was always devoted to that plant .. calling it the mecca of guitar building and pushing for Gibson to keep it open way back in the early 80's. 

 And like it or not in the future some things will change , but it's yet to be seen .  It's amazing that Heritage lives still , it's been touch and go.  But especially here on the site created for the benefit of Heritage owners and future Heritage owners, I choose to be hopeful and positive with best wishes to those that carry on the name. 

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17 hours ago, deytookerjaabs said:

 

 

... it's really Heritage Depot (can I coin this term?)....

At risk of being dismissed as a Heritage "fanboy," and I don't think I am what's implied in that term, I take issue with the Parsons Street/Office Depot comparison.  Not to engage in enthusiastic "serve-and-volley hairsplitting," which usually goes nowhere, but Office Depot is a retail site.  Parsons Street is a manufacturing facility.  Apples, oranges? 

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2 hours ago, yoslate said:

At risk of being dismissed as a Heritage "fanboy," and I don't think I am what's implied in that term, I take issue with the Parsons Street/Office Depot comparison.  Not to engage in enthusiastic "serve-and-volley hairsplitting," which usually goes nowhere, but Office Depot is a retail site.  Parsons Street is a manufacturing facility.  Apples, oranges? 

 

I guess I'm just artsy fartsy....having working in a naturally lit radiator heated big old Chicago 2nd floor factory building just like pre-expansion Parson's....and I've also worked in a fluorescently lit windowless humming corporate office center. Different strokes for different folks. 

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2 hours ago, deytookerjaabs said:

 

....and I've also worked in a fluorescently lit windowless humming corporate office center.

Condolences!  I've been fortunate in having done only a short stint, in the early '80's, as a night shift data entry clerk in a windowless room with about a dozen other people, all of whom smoked.  Just horrific!  I really dug the funk of the old Parson's Street shop.  But I can see, having worked in a large machine manufacturing facility, the improvements in the new shop as positive.

 

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1 hour ago, yoslate said:

Condolences!  I've been fortunate in having done only a short stint, in the early '80's, as a night shift data entry clerk in a windowless room with about a dozen other people, all of whom smoked.  Just horrific! 

 

 

 

Oh, life changing indeed!!!   :laugh_mini2:    I got out of music school knowing I'd need to make ends meet and after a studio I gig I had went under in the crash around '08 I found myself in corporate hell. Funny part is I was great at the job, everyone loved me, at first it seemed okay but then all the reality of corporate politics, sleaziness, and straight up awful behavior came through....it scared me straight for good! The day I walked out for good was one of the bluest skies I've ever seen. 

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1 hour ago, deytookerjaabs said:

 

 

Oh, life changing indeed!!!   :laugh_mini2:    I got out of music school knowing I'd need to make ends meet and after a studio I gig I had went under in the crash around '08 I found myself in corporate hell. Funny part is I was great at the job, everyone loved me, at first it seemed okay but then all the reality of corporate politics, sleaziness, and straight up awful behavior came through....it scared me straight for good! The day I walked out for good was one of the bluest skies I've ever seen. 

You need to write a song about this experience.  And have Yoslate write some high-brow, professorial lyrics that only a few will truly comprehend.  :book1:

It would sell.  :music_mini2:

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