Jump to content
Heritage Owners Club

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/20/2022 in Posts

  1. I have crossed that line many a times. Having 6 Heritages built from 2006 through 2013, on all I have replace with RS pots and caps. Faber bridges and inserts on the Prospect, H150 and Millie. Stoptails were all upgraded as was the bridge on my 575. Factory bridges, pots and caps were purchased in bulk and neither Gibson or Heritage went for premium grade. Most players were OK or upgraded them. Are you "most players?" This is not like adding truck nuts under the rear license plates, if it plays and sounds better, it IS better.
    5 points
  2. The Z Wreck Jr and Heritage H-150 getting a little air on a beautiful day! What a great combo!
    5 points
  3. Well, I'm back in the Heritage Tribe. The deal to buy the black H150 Standard I mentioned a few months ago, fell through (I couldn't quite swing the funds to pay for the rest of the balance to take the guitar off of layaway), but I recently decided that I have too many guitars (I live in an apartment, and space is at a premium), so I decided to downsize my inventory, and replace what were 3 nice electrics, with one really nice electric. Combined with having additional funds compared to what I had several months ago, my thoughts went back to getting the black H150 I almost bought several months ago (Cream City Music still had it in their inventory), but I realized I've always been kind of "meh" when it comes to Les Pauls. I really didn't want another H-535, like I had a back in 2019 & 2020, but I noticed that Cream City Music, had a H530 listed on their website. I like P90s, and I will ALWAYS have a soft spot for hollowbody guitars, so, I paid ye olde guitar shop a visit after work on Thursday. he H-530 sounded great both clean and dirty, and playing it confirmed that the neck (which I'd managed to find what dimensions for online before I tried the guitar out), while not a baseball bat in thickness, was still a Medium C, and had enough heft to it, to keep my fretting hand happy. So, I bought the guitar, and on Friday bought the 3 guitars I wanted to get rid of, for trading towards the H-530, traded them in, and paid the difference, becoming the owner of a new, 2021 or 2022, black H-530. 😀 The guitar is in the shop at the present time, getting refretted with Jescar EVO hypoallergenic fretwire (I have a severe allergy to nickel), and Ernie Ball Cobalts (my electric guitar string of choice, due to them being hypoallergenic), will go in the '530. I also e-mailed Heritage, to find out what the model/part numbers are for the hardware. Heritage (like Gibson and Fender) seems to be one of the fans of "nickel for the vintage tonez", so at least the bridge (where I typically rest my hand when playing), and the buttons on the tuners, will have to be replaced, with their chrome plated equivalents (yay screwed up immune system! 😒). Keep On Playing! - Ellen A Photo of My H-530
    4 points
  4. You may be right about a third changing the pickups, meaning most don't. But it is those who do change pickups who get the most ink (or press or copy or keystrokes). Pickups are just one variable in the chain made of at least a dozen. Schallers seem decent enough. Long ago I had the sense that they must be "pickups of a lesser god" because I read so often about dumping them for something else. I admit I did that. I agree that a different set of pickups, like SD 59s or Gibson Classics, probably won't raise the value of the guitar much except with those who happen to like the particular set you put in. It's a different story if you replace the pickups with Throbaks or other high end pickups. On that topic, I don't know why the "plug in" systems for pickups swaps haven't become the default in the market. The companies would probably sell more pickups if they were easier to exchange. My guess is Heritage went with Schallers because they could get a good price when buying the bridge, tailpiece and pickups in large lots. Like Gibson Classics and SD 59s, those pickups sound good for most purposes.
    4 points
  5. the pair I'm working on for my grandson's birthdays , these will be there first guitars at 6 and 11 . They are stoked
    3 points
  6. I finished the mods on this. I kept the Duncan '59 set, but I replaced the magnets with A2 and added nickel covers. I had some CTS push/pull pots, and the pickups had 4 leads so I rewired it with PIO caps and coil splits. I had a Gotoh nickel bridge, so I used it. I installed an aluminum tailpiece with locking posts. Gotoh locking tuners.
    3 points
  7. Faber hardware has received good reviews here, so I thought I'd give it a try. I ordered the Nashville/ABR bridge and iNsert kit, plus their aluminium tailpiece and studs from DV247 - like Thomann they have a UK branch, but the order was shipped from Germany. The guitar I chose to upgrade was the H150 VSB, on which I had previously replaced the Schaller hardware with a Tonepros set. Installation was straightforward, though there are a couple of points worth noting. When I had removed the bushes into which the bridge posts are located, I found that one of the holes was not deep enough and required careful drilling to extend it. The other point is that the Faber tailpiece studs were slightly longer and so I removed a couple of mm from them. The new posts are a snug fit, and the bridge feels very solid. The Faber tailpiece weighs 28g, compared to 75g for the Tonepros. Playing the guitar, it feels a little brighter (though that may be due in part to the new strings!) and more resonant, and is a worthwhile upgrade. This video nicely illustrates the difference between the Nashville and Faber hardware.
    3 points
  8. I agree with Kuz. These aren't sacred instruments handed to mortals from the gods. I will bet that in another 20 years Gibson and Fender will still dominate in prestige. That doesn't mean they are or will be better guitars. But those names were the trailblazers and the tools of the early masters, and that will never change. I have had a few Fenders in my day. Some were good instruments. I have found G&L to be more consistently right and a better value. Despite G&L having Leo at the helm and now over 40 years of history, G&L remains the bastard child of Fender. The same seems to be the case with Heritage and Les Pauls. Guitars are tools in a sense. My experience in medicine has never shown me a surgeon who is strongly brand loyal to instruments, only shapes and weights. None ever spoke of the vintage bone saw or spinal cord retractor that he wished he had. No one longed for that 1968 pacemaker reissue. It is unspoken but clearly the case that there is a push for continuous improvement. Guitars are more than tools. They are art as well. But there is still more. Guitars seem to capture lost youth in the older players or perhaps whisper a shortcut to mastery and fame in the younger players, given the right instrument. I wouldn't hesitate to alter a CC to my liking. That would be foolish. OTOH, I would not pay that much for a guitar that was defective or not to my liking. We love guitars. There's a thin line between love and insanity.
    3 points
  9. From owning 11 or so Heritages down to these 4 keepers...11
    3 points
  10. In my humble opinion, I don't understand this logic. If a Custom Core was a master oil painting bought as an investment and I hated the frame it came with, then NO I wouldn't change the painting to a new frame to retain the overall value. But a Custom Core shouldn't be bought as an investment. It won't appreciate. It is a guitar, a sonic tool to be played. The Custom Core that I bought had 3 stripped tuners (I know of at least two other CC owners that have had stripped/poor functioning tuners and the dealer I bought mine from said they have had to replace many stripped tuners). I bought drop-in replacement Gotoh tuners that work perfectly. Should I had kept the stripped tuners in the CC to maintain the originality and keeping it unplayable? I also upgrade the volume & tone pots to RS Guitar works super pots. Now my volume & tone pots have a completely useable sweep from 10-1 on the dials. This is a major upgrade to me. I won't even get into the other issues with how the TOM bridge & Stoptail were dysfunctionally installed... but suffice to say I had to use Faber hardware to fix the issues. And yes, I installed Schaller strap locks too. I called Heritage to report the CC QC issues and asked if I could BUY a set of the 225 Parsons pickups before they were potted. Heritage did say that they do the potting in house but despite asking (begging) three times on the call, they refused to sell me unpotted 225 pups. They said in a year or so they may be available with different options. Bottom line is, now that I have fixed the unusable tuners and TOM & stoptail issues my CC became a very, very good guitar. Later after I added the RS Guitarworks upgraded pots it is now an astounding guitar. No one that would have played my CC before and then my CC after upgrades would say the changes I made by "fiddling with it" made the CC worse or devalued the guitar. By the way, amazingly the Schaller straplocks had no effect on the tone!
    3 points
  11. I have a few pedal boards each for different purposes. I use at least two in my 5-6 days a week gig schedule. Besides the fact that I use each board for different things, it's nice to keep two boards in the car just in case of a failure. Even my most minimal board will get the job done. AS long as I have a volume pedal, tuner, and EQ I can gig! This pedal board is centered around my electric guitar playing in bands (I mostly play acoustic solo or duet)... --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Minimal acoustic guitar gigging board (sometimes I do two gigs in a day and have one pedal board setup in each place to save time), Keeley Delay Workstation on the left (it does reverb and delay)... --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- My current dual source pickup acoustic guitar board (I have two pickups in my two main resonator guitars that I do original music showcases with) (Krivo magnetic humbucker on the neck, Highlander active reso pickup on the spider under the cover-plate! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- My current single source pickup acoustic guitar board, which is totally programmable for time based (trem/delay/reverb) FX and special EQ. I have all songs requiring special FX programmed into this. The JHS colorbox and MXR compressor are to shape the tone, and control the peaks of the piezo pickups before they hits the HX Stomp, and the radial DI is for final EQ and to balance the signal.
    3 points
  12. And this is my Standard.
    3 points
  13. Here is a good picture in the natural daylight. It looks awesome in this picture.
    3 points
  14. Given how we seem to be synched, you should have known the answer to that question: The DeFacto Brothers (Gino and me, gtrs.; Ed, bass; the late Chris Garges, drums, engineering; Doug Davis, keys and vocs.; with The Little Big Horns, Tim Gordon and Brad Wilcox)
    2 points
  15. So I just got my first Heritage after all these years. A 2001 H-535. A previous owner pulled the Schallers and wiring harness and installed a Gibson 57 Classic neck and Classic Plus bridge with a new harness. Both pickups read 8.0. They have the original labelling intact so I know its a plus. The Schallers read 7.64 and 8.21 Should I bother to go back to the original pickups to see if I like them or am I already in a better place? I've had other guitars with SD 59s and Seths and really like the sound of those pickups a lot. Thanks for your opinions! Jeff
    2 points
  16. I’ve never heard of anyone that loosened /detuned in between playing before. To me, it seems like that would potentially shorten the life of the strings (the wound ones anyways); and in my mind it seems like this would be more stressful on the neck, as you’d be constantly moving it between relief and tension. Could be wrong about my thinking here though. Would be interested to hear from anyone who might do this.
    2 points
  17. I had a LP that had a '57 Classic and a Super '57 in it from the factory. I waited a little over a year before I decided for sure that they weren't for me. I swapped them for some BKP Black Dogs. Those have been in there for 6 1/2 years, with no reason to swap them.
    2 points
  18. Keep them. Gibson makes really good pickups.
    2 points
  19. Now WHY on god's green earth would you bring of bottle of 20yr old scotch to an AA meeting? 🤣 (that's a fine instrument, btw)
    2 points
  20. The Sex Drive is a pedal that I use when I want more gain/sustain for slide guitar solos. It performs well
    2 points
  21. Like I said, I used Faber Hardware on my Artisian Custom Core, both the locking ABR-1 Bridge and the locking Stoptail posts. The first picture is the original Core hardware (where I couldn't lower the tailpiece that WAY above the body because the strings were hitting the Nashville bridge). The second & third pictures are with the Faber Hardware (HUGE improvement in my opinion).
    2 points
  22. @DetroitBlues posted this on Facebook. It seemed like a good idea to post it here too. Amazing work.
    2 points
  23. Pete Moreno has some pics of this guitar. He did a fair amount of work on it. He has a couple of albums of weird guitars he's help build over the decades. He built this one. ZZ Top came to Kalamazoo to pick it up. Pete had lunch with the band at some small restaurant. ZZ Top was working on a comeback and the bandmates were changing their appearances. Pete said that their table got a lot of looks.
    2 points
  24. I have to agree with Kuz. Even when people are given things they think they are worth more than they are. When you step out of the store the value goes down. If it is your guitar make it how you want it to be. Fine tuning isn't going to hurt it.
    2 points
  25. 2 points
  26. Picked this up a few weeks ago and have done some minor cosmetic mods to customize it. Have been a longtime Gibson Les Paul historic guy (owned 16 of them). Was really curious about these newer Heritage CC H150 models. I know it is not everyone's preference but I like aging on guitars if done well. I really am impressed with this guitar. It is as good as any Gibson CS Les Paul I have had in terms of build, playability, and tone. I have had a few aged ones and this is really well done. Bottom line I want to pick it up and play it. If I have a guitar and it does not meet that test- I move it on. I also picked up a newer (used) H535. Had been searching and going through a lot of semihollows for months. I have had a ton of Gibson Es 335's, Yamaha SA2200's, Eastmans T486, and three other previous H535s in the past. Will do a post with pics on the new H535 soon. It's also an excellent guitar. Heritage is doing a great job these days.
    1 point
  27. Did you get rid of that nice gold top? That thing felt really good, an easy player.
    1 point
  28. Bingo! I had a couple of the nicest CS Lesters you could hope to find, and a Nash LP that was my go-to for years. Once I got my aged CC, they all went.
    1 point
  29. What kbp 810 and zguitar71 said.... Yeah...but which one first...?
    1 point
  30. Thank you all. I appreciate your helps.
    1 point
  31. A buddy's 150 came with '59s. He change them to the lowly Schallers and is so much happier with it. I changed the HRW pups to Phat Cats in my 535 and am happier with it now.
    1 point
  32. The Schallers in my 87 H140 had an obvious problem. I tried changing pots and caps, but it remained. Sound was grossly out of whack. I changed them to AlnicoPro2s and all has been fine. I don't know if it had a short of what, but it didn't sound anything like either my 157 or 535 which both came with Schallers. I still have the Schallers in my H157. I changed out the ones in my 535, and all I can really say is that it's different. It has Sheptones in it now, they seem to be a bit more even from high to low, but as for a massive difference, nah... My Mille has Seth Lovers in it. Schallers aren't bad pickups, they are just different. To me, they seem to have that scooped midrange sound.. almost a "smile" on the EQ curve. That seems to make them a bit on the bottom heavy side. Of course I just tweak the amp setting to tame the bloom on the low strings.
    1 point
  33. Unless there's a compelling reason to change (ie: you don't like the sound of the pickups or something isn't working correctly) I wouldn't change anything. Returning to the original Schallers won't increase the value due to being "original". From what I've seen over the years, about a third of the people with Schallers in their guitars swap them out for other pickups.
    1 point
  34. I wouldn't change them.
    1 point
  35. LOL! That's what I told myself as I opted to install it as opposed to sending it back 😆 It does stick out like a sore thumb from the side though. Still don't dislike it enough to discard... but in the future, I'm sticking with Custom Inlay. Theirs have always been around the same thickness as an OEM plastic TRC; gives the look that it's something that could have came installed from the factory.
    1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. @rockabilly69 interesting PBs there I wonder how that SexDrive(and not only) performs 🙂
    1 point
  38. The most popular old Mesa seems to be the Mesa Mark IIC. Check the prices of those old beauties! I've been holding out, but recently, I bought a Mesa Fillmore 50, and I can tell you it's one of the finest amps I've ever played through. It has two identical channels with three different types of gain voices (Clean, Drive, Hi). Unlike any other dual channel Mesa amp that I've ever used, you can really set up a killer lead tone with the perfect rhythm tone. In the past, I could never get the high gain channels tones of my Mesa amps to sit with my clean channel tones. Typically I just used the clean channels on those amps and hit them with a drive pedal for the lead tones. The Fillmore on the other hand is really easy to dial in some great matching tones for rhythm and lead.
    1 point
  39. Amen!!! Faber is the way to go, forget the Tone Pro stuff. With Faber hardware no more losing or stripping those tiny allen screws like Tone Pros uses. Get the Faber locking Tailpiece posts and use the Aluminium Stoptail that came with your Custom Core. That's what I did.
    1 point
  40. Years ago I played through one of these amps and I was pretty impressed.
    1 point
  41. Guitars are like people. Everyone wants to change them to suit themselves.
    1 point
  42. From years past. Huntsville, AL. 😉
    1 point
  43. This guitar was from the 1990s and was built by the original Heritage owners as a limited run of D'Angelicos. This guitar is one of the last ones they built. It came without a pickup, like the early D'Angelicos were made. Rob Doolittle, a Kalamazoo luthier from Kalamazoo Guitar Company https://www.kalamazooguitarcompany.com/ installed a Dearmond 1100 pickup, which was made in a limited run for Guild about a decade ago. This pickup was built as a true copy of the 1950s originals. https://www.djangobooks.com/Item/dearmond-rhythm-chief-1100-gold Pickups get a lot of hype, but this one really does sound great with that single coil sparkle and little hum. The tone and volume pots are under the pickguard. Gary Hines, who is a member of HOC and a superb luthier, got this pickup for me. Rob Doolittle put in the end jack and installed the pickup. I am indebted to both. Here are the pre-installation pics.
    1 point
  44. I'm hoping we can get some sun around here sometime soon. I have 2 guitars that I need to get pictures of in the sunlight.
    1 point
  45. I checked the old switch that I pulled when I did a new harness, and it was just a generic 3 way switch. There's no manufacturer identification. The threaded area was 11/32" deep. It's a short one like yours. I replaced mine with one from M.Laval, they appear to have exited the market. Philadelphia Luthier supply has a short Switchcraft for $30, or a Japanese made for $10. The Switchcraft specifies 11/32 threaded area. The Japanese specs "almost 3/8" which would be 12/32. I can't say that one is better than the other. There's not a lot that can go bad with these switches, other than getting a bit of dirty or oxidized, unless you start trying to bend the leaves.
    1 point
  46. You add flame to that grain with Ronson fluid and a lighter, ala Jimi at Monterey. Not that I would suggest it for that sweet Tele.
    1 point
  47. After a few anxious days the latest member to the Family arrived safely . I'm very impressed , it reminds me a lot of my Custom Shop CS-356 . Very punchy and delicious tone. The '59 neck and Seth bridge is perfect . I've got 59's front and rear on my 575 C. Now the hunt is on for a 530
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...