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 Hi, I’m I missing something but why is the gold top so loved ? Is it the color , does it have something to do with paint ? 
it’s like flame tops.,,  Beautiful tops don’t sound any better than a regular top. But we pay thousands for it . 

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Oops.  Not Miranda.    

Yes, goldtops are pretty cool.

Goldtops are my favorite. I like certain flametops, both of my H150s have nice flame, but a Goldtop with a little green in it is my favorite finish on a guitar.  To me they have a more get down to bus

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I agree what's up but I still want one.

I always like to see the beautiful wood that Mother Nature provides in these great pieces of art and music.

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My first H-150 is a Goldtop, from Jay Wolfe. I love the job that Heritage did on it. I eventually wore off some of the gold on the top bout with my forearm, and it looks even better that way. Oh, and it's loaded with Bill and Becky's L-495 pickups (noiseless P90 style, with a fantastic growl to them).

rooster.

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It's all about the nostalgia and the look. As others have said, that was the color of the original Les Paul guitars. That lovely bronze powder gold suspended in lacquer.  It's not easy to do actually. Getting the powder to properly suspend can be a pain. Thankfully there are now companies that make very usable bronze powder color coats.

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Goldtops are my favorite. I like certain flametops, both of my H150s have nice flame, but a Goldtop with a little green in it is my favorite finish on a guitar.  To me they have a more get down to business look about them...

 

 

GT R4.jpg

GT R7.jpg

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They look great on those black and white TVs.

 

My first six string electric was a 68 goldtop and first Heritage a 2006 H150 goldtop    Iconic. 

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While not for everyone, Gold Tops are beautiful.  But a lot of opaque colors on guitars are not everyone's cup of tea.  The Goldtop Heritage paints on their guitars is really close to the original Les Paul finish from 1952 through 1957.  Just a classic finish.

I've had three Heritage Gold Tops, the color is just beautiful.  Only models I do not like are the all gold Heritages (front, back, neck, and sides painted).  I like seeing wood grain. I don't mind a solid color top, but leave the back and neck showing the wood grain.  

Edited by DetroitBlues
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12 hours ago, Spectrum13 said:

They look great on those black and white TVs.

 

My first six string electric was a 68 goldtop and first Heritage a 2006 H150 goldtop    Iconic. 

Likewise...my first Gibby (back in the day) was a late 60's LP deluxe. I loved the look but could never really get comfortable with the neck and weight.

Now that I have been educated and become a big fan of the 140 series, this gold top thanks to  skydog52 via ebay is on it's way and will hopefully arrive safe and sound.

A trip down memory lane I am hoping , only better.

Screen shot 2020-10-25 at 11.12.50 PM.jpg

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It should be noted that Gibbons no longer uses bronze powder pigment in their regular Goldtops. They have moved to gold mica, which does not turn green when it wears like the bronze does. So, unfortunately the new ones will not age like the old ones. I'm sure however that the Historic models are not affected.

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I have two, a 2001 Les Paul GT, sans pickguard, (Duane), and my Heritage H-150 GT with P-90's. The Heritage has a lighter shade of gold than the Les Paul. Every time I open either guitar case, I kind of gasp. That is what makes them so special. 

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On 10/27/2020 at 11:10 PM, Gitfiddler said:

Yes, goldtops are pretty cool.

lhBrP7.jpg

That's what I am talking about now!

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I’m a big fan of Goldtops. I prefer P90s and if money was no object I would have an original from ‘52-‘56.Money is an object that is hard to obtain so I have my H150GT with my sweat stains and wear patterns. It’s my main gigging guitar. painted and plain wood guitars are my thing no over the top tops for me. 
 

AB417CE4-7336-40E0-9C85-E34E12FE4492.thumb.jpeg.02c9708fce4064e4afb73a053c426837.jpeg

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On 10/28/2020 at 10:42 AM, tbonesullivan said:

It should be noted that Gibbons no longer uses bronze powder pigment in their regular Goldtops. They have moved to gold mica, which does not turn green when it wears like the bronze does. So, unfortunately the new ones will not age like the old ones. I'm sure however that the Historic models are not affected.

That's interesting.... The mica pigments should be a lot more cost effective.  And, you are correct that mica won't oxidize and turn green over time.   In general, the micas tend to give more of a pearlescent appearance vs the metallic look of a bronze or aluminum powder.   I can tell you from experience that bronze powders are  PAIN to work with, but its pretty hard to duplicate that appearance any other way. 

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13 hours ago, TalismanRich said:

That's interesting.... The mica pigments should be a lot more cost effective.  And, you are correct that mica won't oxidize and turn green over time.   In general, the micas tend to give more of a pearlescent appearance vs the metallic look of a bronze or aluminum powder.   I can tell you from experience that bronze powders are  PAIN to work with, but its pretty hard to duplicate that appearance any other way. 

Yeah, though for some reason they just don't look the same. Even the heritage Goldtops seem to look less "gold".  I believe the actual bronze powder pigment they used in the old days is still available - Cres-Lite made by Crescent Bronze Co. of Oshkosh, WI  -  "Extra Brilliant Gold #256"  bronze powder.

http://guitargarage.blogspot.com/2012/08/refinishing-1969-les-paul-goldtop.html

Edited by tbonesullivan
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3 hours ago, tbonesullivan said:

Yeah, though for some reason they just don't look the same. Even the heritage Goldtops seem to look less "gold".  I believe the actual bronze powder pigment they used in the old days is still available - Cres-Lite made by Crescent Bronze Co. of Oshkosh, WI  -  "Extra Brilliant Gold #256"  bronze powder.

http://guitargarage.blogspot.com/2012/08/refinishing-1969-les-paul-goldtop.html

I think Heritage in recent years has also updated their formula... wonder if this is what they've done...

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